ORANGEBURG --There was little for Buddy Pough to like about last year's mistake-filled opening scrimmage for South Carolina State.

On Saturday, the Bulldogs' head coach saw plenty to give him even more optimism about the coming season.

With the botched snaps between the center and quarterback kept at a minimum and favorably mild temperatures warding away the heat, S.C. State was able to get a clean, first-hand look of itself in the 62-play scrimmage.

"Thought things went good at times," Pough said. "Anything, you get that first scrimmage of the year, you just kind of line up sometimes. I think we're a little bit past that.

"We seem to have some guys who kind of understand what they're trying to do. Trying to coordinate a little bit, so we can actually get our guys to understand situations and those kind of things. Thought it went pretty well today."

Wofford

As part of the first of six two-a-days scheduled for fall practice, the Wofford football team was on the field for two hours in the morning before scrimmaging for the first time during the evening. Rain and lightning cut the scrimmage short.

"The weather made it a little difficult tonight," said head coach Mike Ayers. "After the first week, we still have a hundred miles to go as far as getting done what we need to get done. A lot of young kids were in there and trying, but just not executing the way that we need to. We will get there."

Michigan

Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez says he's glad facing the NCAA committee on infractions is over.

Rodriguez made a very brief comment after a 7 1/2-hour hearing on violations within the Michigan football program. Rodriguez, school president Mary Sue Coleman and athletic director David Brandon were among the Wolverines contingent.

The NCAA has accused Michigan of five major rules violations related to practices and workouts. School officials challenge the allegation that Rodriguez failed to promote an atmosphere of compliance, but accept responsibility for the other four allegations.

The allegations involve exceeding limits in practice and training time.