Lochte falters again, but Franklin, Grevers shine

Missy Franklin poses with her gold medal after winning the women’s 100-meter backstroke Monday.

LONDON — Michael Phelps has yet to win a gold medal, and Ryan Lochte’s star is fading. So along comes Missy Franklin, yet to start her senior year in high school, to restore American swim hopes at the Olympics.

Coming back less than 14 minutes after swimming a semifinal heat, the Colorado teenager won the first gold medal of what figures to be a dazzling career, rallying to win the 100-meter backstroke Monday.

“Indescribable,” the 17-year-old Franklin said. “I still can’t believe that happened. I don’t even know what to think. I saw my parents’ reaction on the screen and I just started bawling. I can’t even think right now.”

Matt Grevers kept the gold medals coming in rat-a-tat fashion, following up Franklin’s win with one of his own in the men’s 100 back. For good measure, Nick Thoman made it a 1-2 finish for the red, white and blue by taking the silver.

Rebecca Soni nearly pulled out a third U.S. gold, rallying furiously on the return leg of the 100 breaststroke. But she couldn’t quite catch blazing Lithuanian Ruta Meilutyte, a gold medalist at the tender age of 15.

Phelps missed the podium in his 2012 Olympic debut, and Lochte has turned two straight disappointing performances after opening the games with a dominant win in the 400 individual medley. He finished fourth and off the podium Monday night in the 200 freestyle, which France’s Yannick Agnel won by a full body length against a field with gold medalists galore.

Four-time Olympian Venus Williams walked off Wimbledon’s cozy Court 2 gleefully waving her fist as fans chanted, “U-S-A! U-S-A!”

Twenty minutes later, at the other end of the All England Club, Serena Williams departed Court 1 with a triumphant grin and a shout of “Wooo!”

Ten minutes after that, Roger Federer closed out his latest Centre Court victory in pursuit of his first career singles gold medal.

A schedule backlog transformed the Olympics at Wimbledon into a parade of Grand Slam champions, with the Williams sisters and Federer all playing at the same time.

And all won.

Other major champions to advance in singles on a cool, sunny day included three-time Olympian Lleyton Hewitt, top-seeded Victoria Azarenka, Kim Clijsters, Petra Kvitova, Ana Ivanovic and three-time Wimbledon runner-up Andy Roddick.

The U.S. women say they don’t care about the final score. They just want to have least one more point than their opponent at the end of games in the women’s Olympic basketball tournament.

That sounds like the right thing to say after Candace Parker had 14 points and 12 rebounds to lead the Americans to a 90-38 rout of Angola.

Maggie Steffens made sure her first touch of the ball at the Olympics counted. And nearly every other one after that, too.

In her Olympic debut, the 19-year-old Californian scored seven goals — six in the first half alone and the U.S. women’s water polo team survived a pesky Hungarian squad to win its opening match at the London Games, 14-13.

The Chinese won their second straight Olympic title in gymnastics and third in four Games after a dismal performance in qualifying.

China’s score of 275.997 points was more than four points better than Japan, which needed help from a replay to finish second.

Britain initially was announced as the silver medalist, setting off raucous celebrations at the O2 Arena, Princes William and Harry included. The British don’t have a proud history in gymnastics, and this was their first men’s team medal in a century.

But Japan questioned the score of three-time world champion Kohei Uchimura on pommel horse, the very last routine. While judges huddled around a video screen, the British partied and Uchimura and his teammates sat stone-faced against a wall.

About five minutes later, Uchimura’s score was revised, with judges giving him seven-tenths more credit for his dismount. Instead of 13.466, he scored 14.166 enough to move Japan from fourth to second with a total of 271.952. Britain was bumped down to bronze.

Switzerland stripped a soccer player of his Olympic accreditation after he sent a threatening and racist message on Twitter about South Koreans. The comments by Michel Morganella came hours after the Swiss lost to South Korea, 2-1, on Sunday.

The 23-year-old player said in the tweet that South Koreans “can go burn” and referred to them as a “bunch of mongoloids.”

A Colombian soccer player was suspended for two games after U.S. forward Abby Wambach said she was “sucker-punched” in the right eye by Lady Andrade during the 3-0 win by the U.S. on Saturday. Wambach called for FIFA to take action, while Andrade called it “an accident.”

FIFA says its disciplinary committee suspended Andrade for a group match today against France.

and for the quarterfinals if Colombia advances.