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Golf is a longtime anchor of the tourist business in the state, which has played host to a growing list of one-off events, from the legendary 1991 Ryder Cup to the U.S. Women's Open championship that got underway Thursday.

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There's a reason some of the players in Charleston for the 2019 U.S. Women's Open look really young. Alexa Pano of Lake Worth, Fla., is 14. Megha Ganne of Holmdel, N.J., is 15. Paris Hilinski of La Quinta, Calif., and Reagan Zibilski of Springfield, Mo., also are 15. 

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Inbee Park struggled to play 10 practice holes in Monday's 100-degree heat at the Country Club of Charleston, and then found herself too tired to venture out to sample Charleston's famed dining scene.

When the Clemson women's golf team came to Charleston for a tournament in March, head coach Kelley Hester pointed out the Country Club of Charleston to her top assistant, Heather Bowie Young, and said, "That's where (the U.S. Women's Open) is, and you're going to qualify."

Chris Asbell won't soon forget his five-shot victory Sunday in the Charleston City Amateur. Not only did it help ease the sting of finishing second in the tournament a year ago, but Asbell will also remember it for the way the round started.

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The U.S. Golf Association is bringing yet another championship to Charleston, announcing Monday that the 2023 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship will be played at the Kiawah Island Club's Cassique and River courses.

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Jennifer Kupcho, the Wake Forest senior who won the first U.S. Women's Amateur event at Augusta National this month, turned down her automatic invite to the U.S. Women's Open in Charleston to turn pro but earned a spot Monday by winning a qualifying tournament in Greensboro, N.C.

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Although there are fewer golf courses than the last time the South Carolina Golf Course Owners Association initiated a study on the game's economic impact in the state, revenues have improved and golfer expenditures remain good or better.