Charleston's Super '60s

Quarterback Johnny Unitas (left) and coach Weeb Ewbank were part of the Baltimore Colts' trip to Charleston in 1960. Both of the teams participating in today's Super Bowl, the Colts and the New Orleans Saints, played in exhibition games at Johnson Hagood

NEW YORK -- You thought you found your one true love online, but now you've been dumped by text or defriended on Facebook without a peep of explanation. Hours of bad TV in your bathrobe haven't helped. Your friends are tired of your whining.

Forget a pampering makeover to help heal your broken heart this Valentine's Day. Go for a "digital breakover" instead, using a growing number of tech tools to save you from yourself or to sob on a safe shoulder in the ether.

Only one of the Apple app store's recent top 12 downloads for the iPhone was about something other than romantic love, but breakup tech hasn't kept pace.

Melissa McGlone, 46, in Alexandria, Va., turned to The Ex-App after a three-year relationship ended recently with an unceremonious text. After a weak moment or three of electronically stalking her dumper, she used the text, call and email blocker to hold his digits at bay until she could resist temptation on her own.

"I no longer humiliate myself by trying to contact him," said McGlone, a divorced mother who was 18 years out of the dating scene when the two first met.

The free app took off last March with about 3,000 downloads in the first nine months.

Oldie, but goodie

In New York, 28-year-old Amanda Green relied on the well-established Dear Old Love Tumblr blog after she was dumped on Independence Day 2009 a year into a relationship. The site for the lovelorn describes itself as an anonymous safe haven for "short notes to people we've loved (or at least liked). Requited or unrequited."

"It's a refuge for those of us who know our friends are getting tired of listening to us, or those of us who don't have a confidante at all," said Green, who posted there regularly for a few months.

For Green, it was a place to let go. Hard.

"When I went to your apartment to get my things, I dipped your toothbrush in the toilet. I wasn't gonna kiss you ever again anyway," she poured out in one of the messages she left there.

"It's a, perhaps unfortunately, true story," Green said, "but I'm in a much better place now. I think I deal with this stuff better now. I'd like to think Dear Old Love has something to do with that."

Other options

There's also CheaterVille.com, a site full of alleged cheaters complete with mugshot-like photos and sometimes lengthy explanations of love deceptions. While the culprits are identified by name and town, the posters are anonymous.

And NeverLikedItAnyway.com, where dumpees sell off their engagement rings, wedding gowns and other gifts from exes.

Melnik and Andrea Miller, who runs the dating portal YourTango.com, are certainly tech savvy, but they're both old fashioned when it comes to breaking up.

"It's totally inappropriate to break up digitally," Miller said. "You should have a conversation."