Cherry berry pie

Cherry Berry Jumble Pie

Fluffy Ruffle Cherry Berry Jumble Pie

(recipe by Kate McDermott)

From “America the Great Cookbook,” edited by Joe Yonan; published by Weldon Owen. Copyright 2017 Weldon Owen. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission.

Ingredients

6 cups (1½-2 pounds) mixed sour cherries (pitted), blackberries, blueberries, and strawberries (fresh or unthawed frozen fruit)

¾ cup sugar, plus 1-2 teaspoon for sprinkling on top of pie

Small pinch of ground nutmeg

¼ teaspoon salt

Small squeeze of lemon juice

1 tablespoon orange liqueur (optional)

2 tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca

Handful of all-purpose flour for rolling out dough

Traditional Art of the Pie Dough with Leaf Lard and Butter (see recipe)

Egg Wash

1 egg white

2 tablespoons water

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place a deep, 9-inch round pie pan in the refrigerator to chill.

Put the fruit, ¾ cup sugar, nutmeg, salt, lemon, orange liqueur (if using) and tapioca in a big bowl and mix lightly until the fruit is well coated.

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out 1 disk (half) of the pastry dough and place it in the chilled pie pan. Pour the filling into the pan.

Roll out the remaining pastry to slightly larger than the top of the pie pan. For a fluffy ruffle lattice, cut 10 strips each about 1 inch wide. If the dough is cold enough, gently twist the strips; otherwise use them straight. Place the strips over and under one another on top of the filling to make the fluffy ruffle lattice. Use your fingers to make a wavy edge around the outside of the pie. For a full top, lay the pastry, uncut, over the fruit and cut 5-6 vents on top. Trim the excess dough from the edges and crimp them together to seal.

Using a fork, beat the egg white and water together to create an egg wash. Lightly brush some egg wash over the entire pie, including the edges. Sprinkle the top of the pie with the remaining 1-2 teaspoons sugar.

Bake for 15 minutes at 425 degrees, then reduce the heat to 375 degrees and bake until you see the filling steadily bubbling, 35-40 minutes.

Remove the pie from the oven. Let it cool completely so the filling can set before serving.

Traditional Art of the Pie Dough with Leaf Lard and Butter

Ingredients

2 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour (use the dip and sweep method; see notes)

½ teaspoon salt

8 tablespoons salted or unsalted butter, cut into tablespoon-sized pieces

8 tablespoons rendered leaf lard, cut into tablespoon-sized pieces

½ cup ice water, plus 1-2 tablespoons more as needed

Directions 

Put the flour, salt, butter and lard in a large bowl. With clean hands, quickly smoosh the mixture together, or use a pastry blender with an up-and-down motion, until the ingredients look like cracker crumbs with lumps the size of peas and almonds. These lumps will make your crust flaky.

Sprinkle the ½ cup ice water over the mixture and stir lightly with a fork. Squeeze a handful of dough to see if it holds together. If not, mix in more water as needed. Divide the dough in half and make 2 chubby disks each about 5 inches across. Wrap the disks separately in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator to chill for about 1 hour.

Notes

Exact measuring is needed for cakes, but pie dough — at least mine — is pretty forgiving. A bit extra here or there, and it will still turn out fine. But, if you measure way over or under the rim of your cup when measuring out the flour, your results may vary from mine. So, I recommend using the dip and sweep method: dip the measuring cup into the flour, overfilling it, then sweep the top of the cup level with the flat edge of a knife. 

For an all-butter crust, use 14 tablespoons salted or unsalted butter.

Reach Hanna Raskin at 843-937-5560 and follow her on Twitter @hannaraskin.

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