Details about product recalls can be found in most cases at cpsc.gov. For automobile-related recalls, go to nhtsa.gov.

BMW vehicles

Automaker BMW says it is expanding a recall to cover 1.6 million vehicles worldwide due to possible fluid leaks that could result in a fire.

BMW said that in some diesel vehicles coolant could leak from the exhaust gas recirculation module, part of the emissions reduction system. The leaks could combine with soot at high temperatures and lead to a fire.

The company had already decided to recall 480,000 vehicles in Asia and Europe after fires were reported in South Korea. No injuries were reported. Further examination led to an expansion of the maintenance action.

The recall covers some vehicles made between 2010 and 2017. The company said in a statement that customers with affected cars would be contacted. Some 54,700 vehicles are affected in the U.S and Canada.

Ford cars

Ford Motor Co. is recalling nearly 1.5 million Focus compact cars in North America because a fuel system problem can cause the engines to stall without warning.

The recall covers cars from the 2012-2018 model years with 2-liter four-cylinder engines.

Ford says a valve in the fuel system can stick in the open position, causing too much vacuum, and an engine control computer may not detect the problem. Excessive vacuum can cause the gas tank to deform, as well as other problems.

The recall came after the U.S. government's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration presented owner complaints to Ford. About 1.3 million of the recalled vehicles are in the U.S.

Dealers will reprogram the computer with new software that will detect a stuck valve, which the company says will take care of the problem in most cases. They'll also inspect the valve, a carbon canister and gas tank and replace them if needed.

Ford says owners should keep the gas tank at least half full until repairs are made. The company says it's not aware of any crashes or injuries caused by the problem.

The recall is expected to begin Dec. 10.

Toyota cars

Toyota is recalling just over 1 million vehicles worldwide because the air bags could inflate without a crash or fail to work if there is one.

The recall covers about 17,000 Scion xA vehicles in the U.S. from 2004 through 2006. Also affected in Japan, Europe and elsewhere are the Isis, Avensis, Avensis Wagon, Allex, ist, Wish, Corolla, Corolla Spacio, Corollo Verso, Corolla Fielder, Corolla Runx, and Sienta. The vehicles were built from July 2002-June 2015.

Toyota said an electrical short can damage circuits. That could deactivate the air bags and seat belt pretensioners or cause those systems to deploy inadvertently.

Dealers will replace the air bag control unit. Owners will be notified in December. Toyota wouldn't say if the problem has caused any crashes or injuries.

Harley motorcycles

Harley-Davidson is recalling nearly 178,000 motorcycles in the U.S. because they can get stuck in gear due to a clutch problem.

Documents posted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration say clutches can leak fluid internally, making it so the clutch doesn't have enough lift to disengage the bikes from gears. The agency says that can cause riders to lose control and increase the risk of a crash.

The company said in documents that it had reports of five crashes with no injuries.

Affected models include the 2017-2018 Police Road King, Road King, Road King Special, Electra Glide Ultra Classic, Ultra Limited, Ultra Limited Low, Ultra Limited Shrine, Police Electra Glide, Street Glide, Street Glide Special, Road Glide Ultra, Road Glide, Road Glide Special, Freewheeler, Tri Glide Ultra, CVO Limited, and the CVO Street Glide.

Also covered are the 2017 Softail Slim S, Fat Boy S, CVO Pro Street Breakout, and the 2018 115th Anniversary Ultra Limited, 115th Anniversary Street Glide, 115th Anniversary Street Glide Special, 115th Anniversary Tri Glide Ultra, 115th Anniversary CVO Limited and CVO Road Glide.

Dealers will install a new secondary clutch actuator piston assembly at no cost to owners. The recall is expected to start Nov. 5.