Really feeling the Bern: Democrat candidate gets Bernie Sanders tattoo

Democrat candidate for Congress Dimitri Cherny inked a Bernie Sanders tattoo on his forearm in solidarity with the Sanders movement.

The only announced Democrat looking to take on Republican U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford has inked his lifetime support for Bernie Sanders.

Dimitri Cherny was one of about 20 people who got the image of Sanders’ balding head and glasses tattooed on their bodies last week in advance of Saturday’s Democratic primary.

He put the tattoo on the inside of his left forearm.

“This is a pivotal point in the history of America and because of that, all the world,” Cherny said afterward. “This is a time worth commemorating and remembering for the rest of our lives. This is the time to get inked to show our great-grandchildren where we stood when everything changed.”

The group of tattoo-seekers negotiated a special price with the Blu Gorilla parlor of $20 for each person that wanted one, Cherny said.

Is he going to keep the image long-term?

“Absolutely,” Cherny said.

Cherny is a local social activist who launched a write-in campaign as an independent against Sanford two years ago. He’s never held office before.

Sanford, the 1st District incumbent, is a heavy favorite for re-election in the Republican-leaning Lowcountry. He first must face a primary challenge from state Rep. Jenny Horne, R-Summerville.

Charleston’s own Stephen Colbert, host of “The Late Show,” piled more dirt on the South Carolina grave of Jeb Bush’s failed White House campaign.

During his show last week, Colbert reminded his audience of Bush’s sad “please clap” moment in New Hampshire when he begged an underwhelmed audience to give acknowledgement after his comments on national security.

“He said, ‘please clap,’ and they did,” Colbert said. “If only he had said, ‘please vote for me.’ ”

Bush’s New Hampshire comment was part spun in jest but it became the signature catchphrase signaling the decline and ultimate end of his run.

Colbert’s take came as part of his “Hungry For Power Games” series in which he opines while colorfully dressed as a character from the “Hunger Games” series.

“He had all the advantages of name recognition, but was saddled with the burden of name recognition,” Colbert added in a final punch.

Bush dropped out following his distant fourth place finish in South Carolina.

Compiled by Post and Courier reporter Schuyler Kropf