Medicare, Obamacare issues in Senate ads

U.S. Sen. Jon Tester is hanging on in a brutal re-election battle in Montana despite attempts to label him “Obama’s twin.”

WASHINGTON — For critical Senate races, Republicans are turning to the playbook that served them so well in the 2010 elections. They’re saturating the airwaves with political ads detailing the perils of “Obamacare” and the nation’s growing debt.

Democrats have added Medicare to the equation, trying to make the case that revamping the government health care program for older people would virtually destroy it.

As the Nov. 6 election fast approaches, political strategists and ad writers are pointing to what they believe this year’s vote is about: defending Medicare, creating jobs and standing up to powerful interest, whether it’s Big Oil, big banks or big Washington.

Each state has distinct differences that shape the messages of each race. In conservative-leaning states such as Arizona, Montana and Indiana, the strategy for Democratic candidates is to seek distance from President Barack Obama and display a strong sense of independence. They need to get voters to forgo casting straight party-line ballots. Republicans have tried their best to reinforce links between Obama and Democratic candidates.

In Arizona, Republican Jeff Flake’s first ad after his primary victory pointed out that former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona was recruited by the president to run for the Senate as a Democrat, and that while Flake opposes the president’s health insurance overhaul, Carmona supports it.

“Obama’s man in Arizona? Or Jeff Flake, Arizona’s man in Washington? Some decisions are just easier than others,” the ad’s narrator says.

In Montana, twins Linda and Marsha Frey contend that a vote for Democratic Sen. Jon Tester is tantamount to a vote for Obama. After all, Tester voted for the economic stimulus package and the health care overhaul, they note. “They may not be twins, but they might as well be,” the ladies chime.

Tester won in Montana six years ago, in part, because he was able to convince voters of his independence. Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg has tried to chip away at those impressions by showing how often Tester and Obama are on the same side on the issues.

Enter the Frey sisters. Rehberg’s team was conducting “man on the street interviews” for a television commercial when the sisters showed up. Rehberg’s campaign manager and media consultant saw the identical twins in their matching outfits and had an idea.

“They had such great personalities and I started scratching my head and pulled our media guy aside and I said, “Don’t these two represent what we’ve been trying to say all along? They are a visual for what we’ve been trying to say: Tester and Obama are twins,” said Erik Iverson, Rehberg’s campaign manager.

The ads’ effectiveness, Iverson said, is evident in campaign’s internal polling. In February, only 1 of 5 voters surveyed by the campaign answered that Tester voted with Obama’s position more than 90 percent of the time. Now, more than half do. .

To have any chance of winning, it’s critical for Democratic candidates in those conservative states to display their independence.

In Indiana, Democrat Joe Donnelly explains in an ad that he would work across party lines to extend all the income tax cuts passed under President George W. Bush, even those for the wealthy. He’s incorporated a theme within his political ads, casting his opponent, Richard Mourdock, as an ultra-conservative ideologue who doesn’t compromise.