Hispanics note immigration stances

Aida Castillo places a sticker on her blouse indicating that she had voted during the early voting period on Saturday in Las Vegas.

LAS VEGAS — Elizabeth Alvisar is exactly the sort of voter Mitt Romney needs. A victim of the brutal economy in this swing state, the 30-year-old tax preparer has been out of work for months.

She’s a foe of abortion and gay marriage, and was naturally drawn to the Republican ticket.

But Alvisar has switched her support to President Barack Obama because of his support for legislation known as the DREAM Act. While Democrats failed to get the bill through Congress, Obama in August signed a directive that implemented its key provision — allowing young people brought into the country without authorization as children to avoid deportation if they graduate high school or join the military.

“I have a lot of friends who’ve taken advantage of that opportunity,” Alvisar said.

Obama’s immigration stance, and especially his executive order, has locked in support from a fast-growing demographic group.

The Romney campaign said Hispanics, enduring a 9.9 percent jobless rate, which is more than 2 points higher than the national average, are a natural draw for the GOP ticket.

“Hispanics are hurting almost more than any other demographic group under the Obama economy,” Romney’s Spanish-speaking son Craig, a frequent surrogate in the Hispanic community, said. “They’re really struggling and they understand that this president has failed them and we need someone who understands how to create jobs.”