Charlie Niebergall/AP

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speaks to local party activists on Thursday in Waterloo, Iowa.

WATERLOO, Iowa -- Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said Thursday he'll use "cheerful persistence" to overcome the bumps that marked the first formal week of his campaign.

Gingrich said he isn't surprised by the rough start to his campaign, ranging from Republican outrage at his description of a proposed House overhaul of Medicare as "right-wing social engineering" to being showered with glitter by a gay-rights activist in Minneapolis.

"My reaction is if you're the candidate of very dramatic change, it you're the candidate of really new ideas, you have to assume there's a certain amount of clutter and confusion and it takes a while to sort it all out, because you are doing something different," Gingrich said after he opened an intense three-day campaign swing in Iowa.

Despite speculation that Gingrich might not be able to overcome his first week stumbles, especially the Medicare comment that ended in him apologizing to Rep. Paul Ryan -- the force behind the plan -- Gingrich told about 150 people in Waterloo that his campaign was fine.

"This campaign is very alive and very well with lots of grass-roots support," Gingrich told the crowd. "It's been a little bit of a challenging week."

Few in the crowd seemed worried about the controversy, and they gave him a warm response with many lingering to have their photographs taken with him.

"We've had larger crowds everywhere," said Gingrich, noting that Thursday's event had to be moved to a bigger room because of the number of people who turned up. He said his brash talks and bold approach are the hallmarks of his appeal.

Part of his problem, Gingrich said, is the media is accustomed to politicians sticking to talking points and aren't prepared for his wide-ranging views.

"If you give them the standard three points, they know how to write down the standard three points," said Gingrich. "If you're careful and really cautious and repeat robotically everything that you've memorized, then fine, but how do you get to real solutions?"

He said reporters covering his campaign must adjust their thinking.