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South Carolina National Guard transportation soldiers move Military All-Terrain Vehicle

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South Carolina National Guard transportation soldiers move Military All-Terrain Vehicle

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. R. Van McCarty, the adjutant general for South Carolina, meets with U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Gordon L. Ellis, Indiana National Guard 38th Infantry Division Commanding general, at the Port of Charleston, Dec. 2, 2020 in Charleston.

U.S. Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1050th Transportation Battalion, South Carolina National Guard, moved more than 590 Military All-Terrain Vehicles (MATV) from the Port of Charleston to a holding location in North Charleston.

The battalion decided to use this as a learning opportunity for the lower enlisted Soldiers to get hands-on training working with new equipment and partnerships with the U.S. Army Sustainment Command (ASC).

U.S. Army Master Sgt. David Phillips, 1050th Transportation Battalion operations non-commissioned officer-in-charge, said, “This mission was a two-phase mission. The first phase started in October and we moved 337 MATVs with 25 [storage containers]. During the second mission in December we moved 254 MATVs, for a total 591 over a 15-day mission.”

Phillips added, “We felt that having this type of mission would be a great opportunity and experience for our Soldiers. To be one of the few in the state of South Carolina and the east coast to have licensed drivers on MATVs helps tremendously with morale and experience. Having this opportunity to get driving experience not only helps with the mission but increased capabilities and readiness for the South Carolina Army National Guard.”

During the second phase of the mission the Soldiers of the 1050th Transportation Battalion were visited by U.S. Army Maj. Gen. R. Van McCarty, the adjutant general for South Carolina, and U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Gordon L. Ellis, Indiana National Guard 38th Infantry Division commanding general, to show their appreciation for the job well done.

“I think this was a great opportunity for Soldiers to work with active duty Army and civilian contractors while they gain skills on new equipment, skills they would not have had the opportunity to do without the partnerships we have,” said McCarty. “These skills help to build and maintain combat readiness for the South Carolina National Guard and the United States Army.”

Source: U.S. Army National Guard