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Michael Smallwood stars as Frederick Douglass and Emily Wilhoit as Susan B. Anthony in "The Agitators," which will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8 at Pure Theatre. David Mandel Photography/Provided

When the League of Women Voters was first organized 100 years ago, its members were suffragists who had marched and advocated for the passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.

Finally, in 1920, the majority of women were acknowledged as citizens with full voting rights, although full enfranchisement for women of color wouldn’t happen until passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965.

The story of how all women got the right to vote is long and complicated. In 1870, the 15th Amendment provided African-American men the right to vote but specifically excluded women.

This became a turning point for friends and colleagues Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass. Should their fight for the rights of enslaved men come at the expense of their fight for universal suffrage? This dilemma is powerfully told by playwright Mat Smart in “The Agitators.”

Charleston’s Pure Theatre had a highly successful run of this play last spring. Now, Pure Theatre and the League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area have partnered for a one-night-only performance of “The Agitators.”

The play, presented at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8 at 134 Cannon St. Charleston, will celebrate the centennials of both the 19th Amendment and the League of Women Voters. A reception will follow with VIP Host Carolyn Murray, Charleston’s News 2 anchor.

Ticket sales support the League’s continuing nonpartisan work of registering voters, working to increase understanding of major public policy issues and advocating for voting rights and good government policies.

For more information and tickets, go to www.lwvcharleston.org.

BARBARA GRIFFIN

President, League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area

Hidden Lakes Drive

Mount Pleasant

Choose love

A country needs to be run like a home, with love and understanding for everyone. If you have a problem with your child, you don’t kill him, do you? We cannot possibly kill everyone who does not agree with our thinking.

There is a reason for all human behavior and a solution to every problem, but they must be resolved through communication. An academic education is worthless without an ability to communicate.

Hate begets hate, and nothing good comes from it. There are two elements to life: love and fear. Fear has taken over our country.

There was a time when fear was exclusive to adults, but has now spread to our children. We are being exposed to a trickle-down of hatefulness daily.

The only way to remove fear is with love. This act of killing will live with us forever. We have a whole country of people who hate us now, and we will continue to live in fear.

Nothing can ever be unsaid or undone. When you get to the “why” of a problem, you can solve it.

To hate or argue is an act of ignorance, a waste of time. Communication is the key to living in harmony with others and people around the world.

This is not our world, and we need to put down our big stick and show empathy by getting to the root of problems and peacefully solving them.

ELIZABETH SCHADRACK

Liberty Midtown Drive

Mount Pleasant

No LSU hospitality

Tigers surrounded by Tigers: Clemson alumni in New Orleans, LSU fans in Charleston

Clemson Tiger fans, be forewarned.

When the Oklahoma University Sooners played the Louisiana State University Tigers in New Orleans in the BCS National Championship Game in 2004, here’s how Oklahoma fans were treated:

We were seated in the OU Donor section. They announced there were gift bags under every seat, but there weren’t any in our section.

Ushers haughtily told us, “we didn’t have time to put them there.” So none of the giveaways reached us.

On our bus ride back to the hotel, fans stood outside and pushed the bus back and forth, rocking it until the driver said he could go no farther.

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So all of us, mostly fans over age 60, had to get out and walk through drunken celebrators for three or four blocks to our hotel.

At a scheduled pep rally in a park, LSU was assigned a 1 p.m. time and OU assigned 3 or 4 p.m. time. LSU didn’t leave the park, so our pep rally was greatly diminished.

It was a frightening and unpleasant experience.

ELLEN BREWER

Fox Tail Drive

Edmond, Oklahoma

Guns in church

Since 1953, I have been going to church. I have visited many denominations for a kaleidoscope of reasons. I just never thought of packing a pistol.

Not since the Revolutionary War days of British Col. Banastre Tarleton do we do this.

Georgetown County church suffers damage in fire, juvenile charged with arson

Lord have mercy on our souls. Nikki Haley’s gut reaction was correct. This is not a church activity.

My family has war dead all the way back to the 17th century, but we don’t have church dead.

GERARD WATERS

Dogwood Ridge Road

Summerville