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The Post and Courier provides a forum for our readers to share their opinions, and to hold up a mirror to our community. Publication does not imply endorsement by the newspaper; the editorial staff attempts to select a representative sample of letters because we believe it’s important to let our readers see the range of opinions their neighbors submit for publication.

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Letters to the Editor: Is it time for flat tax?

2018 IRS Tax Forms (copy)

The wealthy are using the federal tax code to avoid paying a lot of taxes. File/Keith Srakocic/AP

The Oct. 4 Post and Courier column by David Slade was most informative. He noted that 92 of the Fortune 500 companies, including the likes of Amazon, paid zero in federal taxes in 2019.

The national media made a big point in noting that the president paid $750 in each of the past two years, but no mention that he rejects his $400,000 annual salary. He paid what the federal tax code requires.

I recall in past years that multibillionaire Warren Buffett paid a lower rate than his secretary, which points to the peculiarities of the tax code. Those companies and individuals are merely using the code as written.

Perhaps it is time to consider a flat tax again as advocated in past years.

Congress, however, has not seen fit to consider such a change since 1995.

DONALD H. LINDSEY JR.

Two Oaks Drive

Charleston

Empty seats

I enjoy a good contradiction.

Recently, I was riding my tandem bicycle alone to a blind friend’s home to go for a cruise around the city and share some time together.

Two different drivers commented on my empty seat.

“That’s really sad you’re alone,” said the first driver.

A few blocks later a driver said, “you’re missing your passenger.”

I just smiled and nodded my head.

The contradiction? Each driver was alone and missing any passengers.

Multiply that by several million drivers without passengers, missing billions of passengers in their empty seats on a daily basis.

That’s sad.

F.X. CLASBY

Riverside Drive

Charleston

Laurel Island swap

The developers of Laurel Island should trade with the State Ports Authority for the Union Pier property.

The port gets deep water and rail access, and is basically an extension of the Columbus Street Terminal.

This would be perfect for BMW and Volvo.

The Laurel Island developers get a downtown footprint and no railroad in the way.

Laurel Island, a former garbage landfill, would be better off being paved over instead of used as the site for residential properties that would be venting methane gas.

JOHN MILES

Markfield Drive

Charleston

Negative ads

ates will read this letter and do as I ask of them.

We see all the political ads on television and in newspapers.

Trust me, we all get it: You want to win your election.

When I look at the hundreds of thousands of dollars that are being spent, I simply cannot fathom the amount and total waste of money.

All candidates say they know how we are hurting, but they don’t.

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All we want is to work for a living. We do not want handouts. We want jobs to be able to live our lives.

I ask every political candidate seeking office to take two weeks and stop running all of the ads.

Take that money and donate it to South Carolina as a fund for the citizens.

We need our leaders to let us get back to work so we can take care of ourselves and our families.

Start a fund to help us, not to win an election.

We need more than just lip service.

Take the Lincoln Project ad off TV, too. Take that money and put it in the same fund.

We are smart and can figure out which candidate to support.

SHARON COMBS

Four Seasons Boulevard

Summerville

Other lives matter

The Black Lives Matter movement is the subject of much debate: pro and con, racial, political or even general opinions.

It seems most people are truly missing the mark.

To offer a new perspective, look at the word: matter.

Matter, in this context, likely means to be of importance or significance.

Ask yourself, “Am I taking the time to value the other human beings I encounter in this world we share together?”

We’ve become a generation that stares aimlessly at screens and often seems too busy to really ask people how they are doing or get to know them.

Whether stranger, friend, associate, black, white or any color, today can be the day that you not only show through actions that a life other than your own matters to you, you can lead by example and show others that their own life is of importance.

If all lives mattered to us, would we be posting political memes on Facebook or opening up our home as a soup kitchen?

When we dig a little deeper, I believe we can all find room for improvement.

Today, I vow to show someone else his or her life matters. Through altruism, we can make our great city of Charleston a better place.

The best part is that these acts remind us why our own lives matter: to help others.

ADAM LIEBENROOD

5th Avenue

Mount Pleasant

Political circus

After enduring the uncivil presidential debate, I declared I would not watch any more political charades on TV. Therefore, I can’t explain why I relented so soon to view the vice presidential debate.

Five minutes into the VP debate, I realized how this was going to be a rerun of the previous debate. I watched long enough to feel my blood pressure starting to rise at the sound of the candidates’ lies.

The moderators at both debates failed miserably at their attempts to control the discourse.

To get respect for the two-minute time limits, the moderator should have the authority to shut off the microphone of the offending party.

The political hostility in America that I’ve witnessed in my 83 years has become so disturbing that I deeply fear that the nation my grandchildren are growing up in will not resemble the one I grew up in.

The disparities in our beliefs of what is right and wrong bring to my mind the statement, “A house divided cannot stand.”

It’s not if or even when our house becomes divided, for it already is, but how much longer can it stand?

E. DUBOSE BLAKENEY III

Church Flats Road

Hollywood

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