New bridge rendering (copy) (copy) (copy) (copy)

A rendering of the Ashley River bike-pedestrian bridge (right) for which the city was awarded an $18.1 million federal grant Wednesday to build. provided

I want to commend our local government officials and conservation groups for their great successes recently in helping maintain the livability of the Lowcountry.

In the span of one week, the Lowcountry was granted $18.1 million in federal funding for an Ashley River bicycle-pedestrian bridge in Charleston, the conservation easement for Boone Hall farm in Mount Pleasant was finalized with the land owner’s generous donation of 75% of the land value, and an agreement on a revised safety plan for S.C. Highway 61 in Dorchester County will result in added safety and save the grand trees along the road.

These achievements are all great examples of the genius of and versus the tyranny of or.

We don’t have to choose between cars or bike-ped. We can have both.

We don’t have to choose between development or conservation. We can have both.

We don’t have to choose between roads or trees. We can have both.

Hopefully, this cooperative approach

will be used in other areas of the Lowcountry facing “or” decisions, including the Cooper River Historic District, Four Holes Swamp and Johns Island.

For example, on Johns Island we can continue to be both urban and rural.

The city of Charleston and Charleston County have wisely established an Urban Grown Boundary on Johns Island so the area within the UGB (what most people off the island think of as Johns Island) can continue to grow while the area outside the UGB remains rural.

Maintaining this “and” approach will require political will to resist up-zoning and conservation funds for easements.

Based upon recent successes, I am optimistic we can continue to make and decisions for the Lowcounty.

JOHN ZLOGAR

Frisco Lane

Johns Island

Enforce traffic laws

Laws, ordinances and rules have little effect if they aren’t enforced. Note the traffic on I-526 between the port and the I-26 exit.

A significant number of tractor-trailers headed to and from the port ignore signs that tell them to drive in the right lane only.

As a result, trucks crowd both lanes. Accordingly, drivers who don’t want to be behind a big rig weave in and out of traffic.

That situation is made all the more perilous by reckless drivers who do their weaving at speeds greatly exceeding the posted limit.

Rarely do I see law enforcement officers monitoring traffic or stopping violators. Failure by our local, county and state governments to enforce our laws is problematic at best and egregious at worst.

Because truck congestion affects community safety, it’s imperative that officials enforce traffic laws.

DAVID BROWN

Creek Landing

Charleston

Nationalism

A Nov. 7 Post and Courier letter writer criticized Skip Johnson’s review of Katherine Stewart’s book, “The Power Worshippers: Inside the Dangerous Rise of Religious Nationalism.”

The letter writer called herself a conservative Christian, as opposed to right wing, and objected to the term “Christian Nationalism,” asking, isn’t everyone who love his or her country a nationalist?

The writer fails to recognize that “Christian Nationalism” is a political movement whose adherents falsely believe the United States was founded as a Christian nation and that our founders never intended to create a secular republic.

Christian Nationalists believe the constitutional principle of separation of church and state is a fraud promoted by secular Americans.

They try to impose on everyone laws that reflect their view of Christianity, regardless of the views of different denominations or those who are nonreligious.

Christianity is a religion. Christian Nationalism is a political movement.

The United States was founded on principles of religious freedom without the government favoring one religion over another. In light of the religious wars in Europe, our founders viewed religion as a private matter that government should have no part in.

The letter writer also equated abortion with murder. The book review noted that Jesus was a Jew, that Jews view life as beginning at birth and that Jesus never mentioned abortion.

According to Katherine Stewart’s book, abortion became an issue for Christian Nationalists because that seemed to be the best approach to gain political power through the Republican Party.

HERB SILVERMAN

George Street

Charleston

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Support for priest

I write in support of the Rev. Robert Morey of St. Anthony Catholic Church in Florence for not allowing former Vice President Joe Biden to participate in Holy Communion.

Charleston faith leaders react to Biden being denied Holy Communion at SC Catholic church

Mr. Biden’s public position on abortion has changed over the years. In 2006, he said, “I do not view abortion as a choice and a right” but rather a “tragedy.”

In 2007, he wrote that he had “stuck to my middle-of-the-road position on abortion for more than 30 years.”

He expanded on that by stating he personally opposed abortion, “but I don’t think I have the right to impose my view, on something I accept as a matter of faith, on the rest of society.”

Just this year, he publicly stated that he supported the overturning of the law commonly referred to as the Hyde Amendment, banning publicly funded abortion on demand, paid for by federal tax dollars, and that he would actively work to make this happen.

This change in position he held for more than 30 years was reported by most, if not all, television networks and newspapers. It would have been impossible for Father Morey not to know about Mr. Biden’s change of opinion on abortion, its funding and his stated intentions.

The Catholic Church’s canon law states that anyone “obstinately persevering in manifest grave sin are not to be admitted to Holy Communion.”

As such, Father Morey courageously did his duty to deny him Communion. Hopefully, Mr. Biden now realizes the weight of his decisions and that there are significant consequences to his actions.

ANTHONY MESSIER

Red Hill Road

Camden

Education issues

Scoppe: How is it even possible to educate SC’s poorest kids? This program holds clues

Post and Courier editorial writer and columnist Cindi Ross Scoppe consistently provides knowledgeable and in-depth reporting on local educational issues.

I, for one, am grateful for her public service on a topic of utmost importance to all S.C. residents.

Our children are our future. Sadly, our elected officials have yet to agree on an equitable statewide funding plan, and we are still not providing a competitive education for our many children living in poverty. It is well beyond time for action.

MARSHA MORELAND

Cherokee Rose Circle

Mount Pleasant