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Flood waters inundate Ashley Avenue in the heart of Charleston's medical district in June 2018. File/staff

I enjoy a good comparison: Charleston’s water management plan versus ancient Mesopotamia’s is a good one.

Tour guides are fond of the saying, “Charleston is between the Ashley and Cooper rivers, which come together to form the Atlantic Ocean.”

Mesopotamia means “between the rivers.” The Sumerians built dikes and canals 6,000 years ago. Children learn this in school.

I live and work downtown and ride my bicycle every day.

When I began working at MUSC 28 years ago, I rode through sunny-day tidal flooding twice a year.

Over the years, flooding has increased to twice a month with each full and new moon.

Last month, high tides rose through stormwater drains and left a pluff mud, salty sediment and debris on Ashley Avenue in front of my clinic.

Over the years, I have seen a lot of stalled cars in floodwaters. My bicycle has never stalled, but I do occasionally oil the chain.

To summarize the Dutch Dialogues, “Build dikes, ride bikes.”

F.X. CLASBY

Riverside Drive

Charleston

Time for education

Teachers gathered outside the Statehouse last session and pleaded for the Legislature to focus on improving education. Meanwhile, our legislators remained tied up debating what to do about Santee Cooper.

For the past couple of years, Santee Cooper and our state’s energy issues have been front and center due to the V.C. Summer debacle.

SC does not plan to change how the state pays for K-12 schools in 2020

Thankfully, the Legislature produced a process and a timeline for dealing with Santee Cooper.

It’s imperative that the timeline is followed. Any extension would mean only more legislative focus on Santee Cooper.

Education and many other issues deserve legislative time too.

Everyone involved with Santee Cooper needs to stick to the established timeline. The future of our schools depend on it.

LARRY KELLEY

North Ocean Boulevard

Surfside Beach

Slave reparations

House Resolution 40 is a bill that would establish a commission to examine the legacy of slavery and make recommendations for reparations.

Support for this bill is building as more people realize that our country has minimized its original sin.

At reparations forum in SC, a descendant of American slaves leaves with questions

If we want to seriously address how white supremacy and racism influence American society, we need to do it the right way.

We don’t have the luxury of assuming people see a need for reparations.

The white supremacy and racism accompanied the founding of this country remains mostly untaught. Over the past eight years, I have traveled through more than half the states in this country speaking about the history of racism in America, something audiences remain largely unaware of. My conversations with people have shown that educating people about white supremacy is a critical first step in the movement for reparations.

Mr. Jameion Fowler of Myrtle Beach, a descendant of slaves, wants local solutions and doesn’t want to wait on the passage of H.R. 40.

When it comes to national solutions, however, we must be willing to have our ideas and proposals vetted. No group has a monopoly on good ideas. Only with critical examination can we develop solutions to the lasting wrongs of American slavery.

The ACLU supports H.R. 40 and urges people to contact their representative to do the same.

JEFFERY ROBINSON

ACLU Deputy Legal Director

Broad Street

New York

Come back, Kasich

Given the political climate, I recently reread the editorial staff’s glowing 2016 endorsement of presidential candidate John Kasich.

I long for “boring and calm” during these turbulent times. I hope my fellow South Carolinians now see the importance of principled and experienced leadership.

Hicks column: There are reasons not to hold a GOP primary, but this isn't one of them

Our national deficit recently reached nearly $1 trillion. I fear I’ll be leaving this legacy to my children and future grandchildren.

I was promised that Donald Trump would pay off our national debt in eight years. Instead, the debt has grown by almost $3 trillion since he’s been in office.

Mexico was supposed to pay for a border wall. Now, U.S. taxpayers are funding it.

Our international ties are being severed under the guise of “bringing our troops home” when our troop levels have been increased in Saudi Arabia.

The United States deserves an honest president, not one who dehumanizes anyone who dares disagree with him. More than ever, our nation needs a president who can unify our fractured country. John Kasich was and is that person.

John Kasich, if you’re listening, please get in this race.

LISA SAVAGE

Fort Johnson Road

Charleston

Palmetto trash

I have lived in and traveled in many parts of this country. South Carolina has by far the biggest bunch of litter-throwing people anywhere.

The Palmetto Pride and Litter Trashes Everyone campaigns have had no effect.

New solar-powered trashcans in downtown Charleston placed to save city $200k a year

On Oct. 4 in Ravenel, a fast-food restaurant sold someone a meal and a drink. The purchaser used a Visa card.

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I know this because a few minutes later I was picking up the purchaser’s trash, including the receipt at my driveway entrance.

Could this time-stamped receipt be used to find and fine this person? It seems to be the same people who litter day by day. I find receipts with trash on numerous occasions. Roadside signs warning of fines for littering are useless if no one ever gets fined

COLIN BENTLEY

Old Pond Road

Johns Island

Dumbing us down

Statements by politicians in Washington, D.C., used to be aired only at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m.

Over the years, Americans have been inundated with a great deal of verbiage that any viewer used to readily recognize as absurd.

SC does not plan to change how the state pays for K-12 schools in 2020

I used to shake my head and think that only a lawyer defending an obviously guilty client would use such ridiculous arguments.

I would then go about my day. At the time, nobody I knew talked like that and everyone had working absurdity meters.

With politicians rationalizing their positions 24/7 for years now, many viewers have been so immersed in this foreign language that they have become fluent speakers.

They’ll regurgitate what they hear and make clear their absurdity meters aren’t working.

Washington has dumbed down the nation.

MICK NORTON

Forde Row

Charleston

Medical coverage

Concerning the recent judicial rejection of President Donald Trump’s proposed requirement for medical insurance coverage prior to immigration, please note Ellis Island Hospital during the greatest immigration in United States history.

During its immigration time, it was the largest and most advanced hospital, not only in New York, but in most of the U.S.

It was New York City’s teaching hospital. Resident doctors competed to serve in this immigrant hospital. For most patients, it was the first time receiving medical attention.

Is not life an inalienable God-given right? How times have changed. Money and moneymongers rule our supposedly humanitarian Christian nation.

PAUL FLAHERTY

Third-generation

Ellis Islander

Atlantic Avenue

Sullivan’s Island