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The Post and Courier provides a forum for our readers to share their opinions, and to hold up a mirror to our community. Publication does not imply endorsement by the newspaper; the editorial staff attempts to select a representative sample of letters because we believe it’s important to let our readers see the range of opinions their neighbors submit for publication.

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Letters to the Editor: Change shortage prompts some restaurants to round bill up

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Steel City Pizza.jpg (copy)

Because of a shortage of change, some restaurants are rounding up bills to the next dollar or asking patrons to pay with a credit card. File

A friend and I had dinner at a Folly Beach restaurant and were surprised when the waitress brought our check and told us the restaurant would not accept or give back any change.

What they do is round the total up another dollar. We did not like paying this way, but there was little we could do about it.

We later experienced the same system at another restaurant. We have since decided to use a credit card, and this way we are billed and pay the exact amount we owe.

To us, not giving back our change is wrong. This has nothing to do with tipping. We don’t have a problem with tipping, but not giving back our change is unethical.

In the July 24 Post and Courier, I read an article headlined, “Why coins are so hard to find right now.” As I read it, my mind went straight to our restaurant experiences.

I couldn’t resist sending a letter to the Federal Reserve System to let it know (at least in part) what we experienced.

If this is happening here, I feel certain it’s going on across the country, accounting for lots and lots of money. Thus may be a big part of why the Federal Reserve has seen a significant decline in coins in circulation.

KIKI DIASOURAKIS

Formosa Drive

Charleston

A key difference

I am responding to the July 28 letter to the editor, “Where is the outrage?”

I believe that the author missed a very important distinction.

The protests that have occurred and continue to occur are not about killings per se but more about who is doing the killing.

The unjust killing of another is wrong. When a person kills another unjustly, they own it.

When a police officer unjustly kills another we own it because it’s done in our name under the color of law.

DOUGLAS deVLAMING

Colleton Drive

Charleston

War memorials

The bill to remove all Confederate statues from the Capitol in Washington is a big mistake. It will only fuel the national divide that is out of control.

It’s like saying, “We won, you lost; so we get all the statues.”

We should remove all military statues, preserving only the memorials that remind us of the carnage that results from turning inward in conflicts.

The Civil War was a horrible conflict that signaled the end of a horrible inhumanity, but the love and respect needed for true equality are still more hope than reality, which is what we should be working toward.

We don’t need to remember singular feats of military leaders on either side. We need to remember the importance of remaining one nation of mutual respect and civility.

EDWIN ALLEN

Deer Street

Mount Pleasant

Trait of heritage

After reading the profound July 25 letter in which the writer expressed an opinion on the meaning of heritage, one can observe many valid ideas that were expounded upon.

One trait of heritage overlooked was the common denominator of all humankind: the right and obligation of self-defense.

As John Stuart Mill stated so well in his treatise “On Liberty,” “That principle is ... self-protection. That is the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.”

Mill did not endow humanity with that right. It is a birthright of all mankind. For anyone interested in a visionary and a profound liberal of his time, I suggest making a trip to the local library and picking up a copy of this treatise for some of his other thoughts.

By the way, Mill was anti-slavery. He was opposed to all forms of slavery and believed in the humane treatment of all. So, please add this to a description of our heritage.

ANTHONY

JANUSZKIEWICZ

Bears Bluff Road

Wadmalaw Island

Virus vs. hurricane

Gov. Henry McMaster says he will not order a mask mandate because he does not believe he can enforce it.

If we have a hurricane that threatens our coast this year, will Gov. McMaster order a mandatory evacuation?

How will he get people to leave their homes and possessions, get on a crowded highway to go hundreds of miles away if he can’t get them to wear masks while in public?

If masks haven’t been mandated by the time an evacuation is ordered, it will be too late to get holdouts to wear masks that they don’t even own.

And anyone who has been here awhile knows the drill: Go to home improvement stores, gas stations, grocery stores and do any other important errand before leaving town. The stores are always jam-packed.

More hurricanes are predicted this year. The next few weeks could find us in a bull’s-eye.

By not mandating masks, McMaster is creating a nightmare scenario. If there are hundreds of thousands of people on the roads, how is it going to work at rest stops, gas stations, restaurants, etc?

If few people are wearing masks, the risk for many will be high. Just as people avoid the emergency room for heart attacks and other issues for fear of contracting COVID-19, more people will choose to try to ride out the storm than to deal with a high chance of catching the virus while evacuating.

It’s not fair to have to make such a choice due to weak leadership.

NANCY FORREST

Sound View Drive

Mount Pleasant

Political football

It is sad, pathetic and ironic that a worldwide pandemic has been reduced to a game of political football by many state and national leaders.

When you choose leaders in this year’s election, please use your intellect, common sense and concern for fellow human beings.

Let your conscience be your guide, without regard to opinions of others, when you exercise your voting right at the polls or when mailing in an absentee ballot.

FREIDA McDUFFIE

Harbor Oaks Drive

Charleston

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