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The Post and Courier provides a forum for our readers to share their opinions, and to hold up a mirror to our community. Publication does not imply endorsement by the newspaper; the editorial staff attempts to select a representative sample of letters because we believe it’s important to let our readers see the range of opinions their neighbors submit for publication.

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Letters: Development tramples Charleston’s charms

rebar work letters

A worker measures part of a new building being constructed on Meeting Street in Charleston. File/Grace Beahm Alford/Staff

The relentless juggernaut-like destruction of what was once a breathtakingly charming city is alarming and disgusting to me.

It seems that Hurricane Hugo, which hit us about three decades ago, somehow opened the doors to the unbridled construction of hotels, apartments and condominiums.

Being named Conde Nast Traveler’s and other travel organizations’ No. 1 city in the United States for 10 years — we slipped to No. 2 on Tuesday — was a compliment that ironically has led to killing the goose that laid the golden egg.

New construction monstrosities are being erected every day, obscuring more and more of our once beautiful, proud and hospitable hometown.

And, it seems to be accelerating.

The recent battle between Charleston’s Board of Architectural Review and out-of-town developers wanting to build an 8-story, 318-apartment behemoth, in violation of set height restrictions, is just another example of misguided “progress.”

When one drives into Charleston from Interstate 26, all that is seen are huge condos, apartments and hotels.

Gone are the views of our storied church steeples.

If this destruction (not “development”) continues, we will soon reach a point where there will be small access portals between huge waterfront buildings where we will be forced to pay admission simply to view the water ... and eat cotton candy.

Zoning is, and has been, the key to preserving the good things that once were.

I blame decades of councils and zoning department/commissions for giving in to rapacious developers solely for the almighty buck. You should be ashamed.

EDDIE COLLINS

Oldwanus Drive

Mount Pleasant

Noise vs. numbers

Shame on Dorchester School District 2 for caving in to noise rather than counting the numbers about masking in the classroom.

A majority of parents and teachers supports masking, and so does the science.

The kids will gladly wear masks for Halloween, so what’s the problem?

We’re all entitled to our opinions, but these opinions should not be used to bully a school board or to shout down those holding other opinions.

Nothing good gets done when people are mad.

None if us likes to be told what to do, but it beats dying

DOC ARDREY

Oyster Bay Drive

Summerville

I-526 a raceway

Three times in the past two weeks, I have watched cars racing along I-526 going eastbound, and have experienced truckers getting too close to my bumper.

I’m afraid not only for my life but the lives of others.

Which police agency has jurisdiction on I-526? Policing is especially needed between Daniel Island and Mount Pleasant, but I never see a police officer monitoring traffic in the area.

Recently, four sedans flew past us going well above the speed limit. They were racing each other and darting in and out of traffic. They went by us so fast that I couldn’t get a license plate number.

I called the nonemergency police number, but I’m sure by the time the operator asked all the questions, the drivers were well off of I-526 and into Mount Pleasant.

A day later, I was headed to Mount Pleasant on I-526 when another sedan flew past me gunning it at a high rate of speed while darting in and out of traffic.

That same day, a trucker was so close on my bumper, I was afraid he was going to run over me.

I was going 75 mph just trying to get out of his way.

We need law enforcement to do more monitoring of the situation before people are killed.

SUSANNE DANDRIDGE

Smythe Street

Daniel Island

Inmate deaths

The Sunday editorial, “Too many SC inmates are dying and we don’t know how or why. How to change it,” speaks truth on many levels.

But most profound for me was its ending statement that as Christians, we are called in Matthew 25: 35 to serve the imprisoned along with all those in need and who are suffering in Jesus’ name.

We should never rejoice in the mistreatment of prisoners regardless of innocence or guilt, in their untimely passing, nor in their deaths caused by negligence, violence or execution.

Jesus did not come for the sinless; he died for the sinful. In the story of his death on the cross, he turns to the thief next to him and says, “Today you will be with me in paradise.”

Regardless of one’s faith, to be truly human is to have mercy and hope for transformation. That is sorely and ironically lacking by too many who proclaim their faith. South Carolinians deserve more from our jail system and those entrusted to care and protect not only citizens but the incarcerated.

JACKIE MORFESIS

Gilmore Road

Charleston

Add left-turn lane

As part of the proposed bike/walk lane project on Ashley River’s North Bridge, another change is needed.

The project should add a third lane on Cosgrove Avenue after the I-26 interchange to create two left-turn lanes onto Azalea Drive.

Having two turn lanes might reduce the number of vehicles that run the red light.

When I travel to West Ashley on this route, at least one or two vehicles turn after the light has changed to red.

RICHARD JACKSON

Thornlee Drive

North Charleston

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