In the Fact Check story published on Thursday, The Associated Press comments on Mitt Romney’s statement that the Independent Patient Advisory Board will have the power to ration care.

The AP states that is false because under Obamacare the board is prohibited from rationing or restricting benefits, etc. The board, the Fact Check states, will only have the power to force Medicare cuts in costs.

Forcing Medicare cuts is a form of rationing health care and deciding which treatments are paid for by Medicare. Always be sure to check the fact checkers, as they don’t always have the facts.

Robert Savin, M.D.

Privateer Creek Road

Johns Island

Kudos to the staff and star of the Midtown Productions’ “Tell Me on a Sunday.” I made the trip from Rock Hill to see the performance and was not disappointed.

The theater is quaint and tucked away in a shopping center on James Island — well worth the effort to locate.

Mary Fishburne’s performance was outstanding. She’s a Rock Hill native, but that didn’t sway my opinion at all.

Such wonderful talent, Charleston, right there in your midst. I do hope you seek them out and let Mary and Midtown Productions entertain you over and over. I know I’ll be back.

Dotsy McElveen

Bridgewood Drive

Rock Hill

About 250 candidates were disqualified from running for elected office because, according to the state Supreme Court, their filings did not meet the letter of the law.

Here’s what I have been wondering: Why did the chief justice jump into this situation so early? Why wasn’t the Legislature called back into session to fix the error? Where were the Justice Department, ACLU, NAACP, attorney general and state party leaders?

It was clear that a decision like this would have a devastating effect on South Carolina.

Lawsuits rolled in all over the state. Locally the presiding judge sat on the cases for months before handing them off to retired judges. Their decisions seemed to be political.

This decision became known as the Incumbent Protection Act of 2012.

This situation explains why most people want nothing to do with politics. They feel like it’s dirty and not a worthy occupation. They may be right.

Charlie Lybrand

Register of Mesne

Conveyance

Cloudmont Drive

September 28, 1905, is a date that stands out as do those of June 28, 1776, and April 12, 1861. It was the date L. Mendel Rivers was born.

Mendel overcame poverty and was elected in 1940 to become congressman of the 1st District of South Carolina. It was rural South Carolina that elected Mendel. One of his first campaign speeches was at the annual Hampton County Watermelon Festival.

During his 30 years in Congress Mendel looked out for his “district darling.” In 1965 he was elected chairman of the Armed Services Committee, where he looked out for the military. He was one of the few men in Congress who could take on President Lyndon Johnson.

Today most Mendel Rivers military projects are gone and tour guides seldom mention his name.

Jack Bass wrote years ago: We have three great Rivers of Charleston: the Ashley, the Cooper, and the Mendel.

Mendel Rivers was more than a bust on Meeting Street, a federal building or a highway through North Charleston. He was the Lowcountry’s best “natural resource.”

Sept. 28 will always be Mendel Rivers’ Day.

John G. Polk

Calhoun Street

Charleston

I am an accountant licensed by the S.C. Board of Accountancy and have been in public practice for 42 years. I’ve yet to have a client say, “Please scrutinize my records and try to find ways that I can pay more taxes.”

The almost universal statement is, “Please make sure I do not omit any deductions.”

So what’s wrong if Mitt Romney or anybody else paid 14.1 percent, just so long as every deduction was legitimate?

I don’t know what charities benefitted from that 30 percent of Romney money, but maybe it helped some worthy organization keep a few employees on the payroll or helped feed the hungry. I hope so.

Do you think I’ll have any clients who, next tax season, will say, “Don’t take all those silly deductions. I wanna pay more”?

Let’s get our priorities straight. Right now, it appears to me that what Romney or any other politicians is paying in taxes is mighty small potatoes with our jobless rate as high as a Georgia pine, our whole economy teetering on the edge of a cliff and terrorists slaughtering our people and laughing in our faces.

Edward H. Waring III

Parkway Drive

James Island

I agree with the Rev. Joseph Darby’s Sept. 28 column, “Voting on earned trust, not religion.” Too many people paid the price for the right to vote for us to stay home. I also agree that citizens should vote their conscience.

But I hope Rev. Darby is wrong when he says that issues of public policy are more important to most African-American Christians than the president’s stand on same-sex marriage, as well as issues like abortion rights, religious freedom and support of Israel. If that is so, African-Americans are voting for Obama for what they think he can do for them as opposed to what is best for this country.

George Washington said in his first inaugural address that as a nation we should not expect God’s blessings if we defy His revelation of what is right and wrong.

With all due respect, I would like Rev. Darby to explain what President Obama has done to earn the trust of African-Americans.

The Bible says that in the end times even the elect will be deceived. Further, what we compromise to keep, we lose.

Kellie C. Burnup

St. John’s Lane

Ridgeville