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If there is one thing you learn about at Oberlin College, the notoriously progressive liberal arts college, it is surely privilege: white privilege, hetero privilege, gender privilege, you name it.

About 7% of Charleston County residents commuted to work by bus, bicycle or on foot in 2017, according to the most recent data available from the U.S. Census Bureau. That might not sound like a significant number, but it represents more than 13,500 fewer cars on the road on any given day.

Iran has threatened to exceed its enrichment of uranium beyond the limits of the nuclear deal, ratcheting up hostilities just days after it was suspected of being behind the attacks on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman. These threats must be met with a unified response from the United States a…

Here on our coast in South Carolina, we know how important it is to fight for the future of our beaches and do what we must to protect them. That is why a proposal by a Texas-based exploration company to conduct seismic blasting off our coast, as a precursor to offshore drilling, is of such …

The S.C. Legislature continues to ignore the best available scientific information and the recommendations of natural resource management professionals when setting seasons and bag limits for wild turkeys, the South Carolina state wild game bird. This was done despite the fact that wild turk…

With 10 Democratic presidential candidates and five debate moderators on each of two nights, June 26 and 27, each contender will get only a few minutes of talk time (accounting for question time, introductions and closing remarks). Viewers may not get much time to figure out the policy diffe…

Many people recently made fun of a photo posted on Twitter taken in a prosperous neighborhood in Washington. In front of a house were signs supporting various progressive causes, and one declaring that “No matter where you are from, we’re glad you’re our neighbor.” Beside these was a sign op…

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As much as we applaud the June 12 Post and Courier editorial and the Clamagore Restoration and Maintenance Association’s (CRAMA) passion for preservation of the USS Clamagore, we are compelled to provide a number of facts lacking in your recent editorial.

As President Trump’s trade talks with our major partners sway back and forth in the news, free-market onlookers remain hopeful the negotiations will usher in a new day of more free and fair trade across the board, with the elimination or serious reduction in the amount of tariffs, quotas and…

When I was a kid, my dad half-joked that the Roman Empire fell because the Romans used lead to make their pipes, thus poisoning their drinking water supply. Even at age 7, I found that one hard to believe.

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If the near future resembles the immediate past, which it often does, the Democratic nominee in 2020 will be, as the Republican nominee was in 2016, the person favored by the party faction for whom government is more a practical than an ideological concern.

Part of the United States’ awakening to the complex challenges posed by a rising China is the realization that America’s economic vulnerabilities are also national security vulnerabilities. And it’s not just about trade.

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Mexico has launched a major effort to stem the flood of Central American and other migrants overwhelming the U.S. border by greatly increasing security at its own southern border and other measures. But unless Congress acts quickly to provide needed resources to handle the flood and reform asylum law, the relief is likely to be temporary.

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Discussions of Charleston’s housing crisis tend to focus on the plight of homeowners being priced out of desirable neighborhoods or would-be buyers who can’t make the math work on a modest house anywhere in the region, much less near jobs, restaurants and other amenities.

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President Trump’s critics rushed to judgment over the weekend to deride his immigration deal with Mexico. It turns out that was more because of dislike for him than fact.

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It’s always been easy to prophesy Hong Kong’s doom. Ever since Britain handed over the bustling colonial entrepôt to Beijing in 1997, prognosticators and politicos of all stripes warned of its inexorable decline.

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Chinese rulers have gradually and systematically eroded the power of Hong Kong citizens to choose their own government. Hong Kongers don’t like it, and nether should all friends of democracy and the rule of law.

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