Why eat insects? Questionbugs many

Edward Archbold competes in a roach-eating contest Friday in Deerfield Beach, Fla. He died after winning.

MIAMI — As a Florida medical examiner tries to determine how 32-year-old Edward Archbold died after eating insects during a contest to win a snake, people around the country are asking: Why?

Why would anyone eat a live cockroach? Why did he die when several others in the contest ate the same bugs without incident? What inspired Archbold — who was described by the snake store owner as “the life of the party” — to shovel handfuls of crickets, worms and cockroaches into his mouth?

While eating bugs is normal in many parts of the world, the practice is taboo in the U.S. and many western countries.

Yet people do it for the shock factor, and many do so during contests or dares; just last year, folks ate Madagascar cockroaches at a Six Flags in Illinois for a chance to win park passes. Also last year, people ate live roaches at the Exploreum Science Center in Mobile, Ala. And a few years back at Universal Studios in Orlando, contestants in a theme park show purportedly consumed a mix of sour milk, mystery meat and bugs.

Experts point to the rise in reality TV shows and movies such as “Fear Factor” and “Jackass” as egging people on and breaking down the ick factor.

Competitive eaters — like the participants who scarf down hot dogs on Coney Island on the Fourth of July — are quick to distance themselves from stunts like cockroach eating. Competitive eating is regulated, has rules, and always has a licensed emergency medical technician on hand at every event.

Lou Manza, a psychology professor at Lebanon Valley College, said folks who participate in extreme events like bug eating “are looking for things to make life interesting.”

“At a certain level we’re all looking for things to break up the monotony,” said Manza, who participates in extreme marathons and said some people think that is odd. “We’re striving for something that gives life meaning, something beyond the ordinary. The older you get, you start looking for something else.”