Charleston is not Baltimore, but the "Today" show did not make that distinction during a news segment Tuesday morning.

Now, there will be an on-air apology Thursday.

The news clip gave viewers an update on the murder trial of Michael Slager, the North Charleston police officer who fired eight gunshots and killed Walter Scott on April 4, 2015.

As of Wednesday afternoon, the clip in question has been removed from the article on the "Today" show's website. An editor's note appears below the old clip: "This video erroneously included an image from an event not related to the Scott trial, and has been removed." 

A statement from the network confirms the forthcoming apology.

“The video mistakenly included an image from an event not related to the Scott trial, and we apologize.  The image has been removed from the story online, and we will make an on-air correction and apology tomorrow," said Megan K. Stackhouse, vice president of public relations for the "Today" show and NBC News.

A mistrial was declared Monday when jurors were unable to reach unanimous verdict required to convict or acquit Slager. 

Ninth Circuit Solicitor Scarlett Wilson, who prosecuted the case, vowed to try the case against Slager again. 

As Matt Lauer gave national audiences a 27-second update on the status of the case, one image at the end of the segment was not like the others.

As Lauer said, "The mayor of Charleston, community leaders and South Carolina's governor, are urging a calm response to that ruling," an image from the 2015 protests in Baltimore appeared on the screen.

Those protests were related to the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old African American who died in police custody. The image shown was not that of community reaction following the death of Walter Scott or news of the mistrial.

The image did not have any text overlay indicating it was another city and news event from the one being discussed.

Some Charleston-area Twitter users noticed the error and expressed anger at what they saw.

"Hey @TODAYshow I KNOW some of y'all have been to #Chs so I am wondering when you saw any houses like this here? This is NOT Charleston," tweeted @Charlestonian.

The city of North Charleston was praised for its reaction following the death of Scott, 50.

At the time, other protests surrounding the deaths of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers had resulted in violent demonstrations, like those seen in Ferguson, Missouri after the death of Michael Brown.

When the Rev. Al Sharpton came to North Charleston in the days following the fatal shooting, he credited the city for how it responded.

Requests for comment from the "Today" show have not been returned at this time.

Reach Caitlin Byrd at 843-937-5590 or follow her on Twitter at @MaryCaitlinByrd.

Political Reporter

Caitlin Byrd is a political reporter at The Post and Courier and author of the Palmetto Politics newsletter. Before moving to Charleston in 2016, her byline appeared in the Asheville Citizen-Times. To date, Byrd has won 17 awards for her work.