Rev. Barber and Moral Monday protests (copy)

The Rev. William Barber, co-chair of the The Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, will return to the Lowcountry this weekend to raise consciousness about systemic racism, poverty and other societal ills. File/Gerry Broome/AP

The Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival will gather in North Charleston this weekend to raise consciousness about systemic racism, poverty and other societal ills.

Led by the Rev. William Barber, who is also president of the North Carolina-based nonprofit Repairers of the Breach and architect of the Moral Monday Movement, the campaign will be here from Saturday to Monday as he brings the Poor People's Campaign as part of a 25-state We Must Do MORE national tour, which began in September.

The anti-poverty campaign, a modernized version of the movement founded by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., is on a nationwide tour leading to its June Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington, where thousands are expected to gather at the nation’s capital to call on people to participate in moral civic engagement and voting "that cares about poor and low-wealth people, the sick, immigrants, workers, the environment, and peace over war."

Saturday's free events include a community site visit at Fresh Future Farm on Success Street, where those impacted by food scarcity will offer testimonies, as well as lunch and voter registration.

On Monday, organizers will host a march that leads to a mass meeting at Cherokee Place United Methodist Church. The Dr. Liz Theoharis, who is also co-chair of the campaign, will join Barber, clergy, community leaders and residents as they shed light on systemic injustices.

“There are 140 million poor and low wealth people in this country. That is power if it is mobilized, organized, registered and educated. Not just registered to vote, but registered for a long-term movement that votes and that is committed to systemic change," Barber said in a statement.

Barber visited Charleston earlier this year when he spoke at an event commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Charleston Hospital Strike.

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Reach Rickey Dennis at 937-4886. Follow him on Twitter @RCDJunior.