NRA holding annual convention in Texas

Barry Bailey and his wife Judy, of DeRidder La., walk out hand-in-hand, after having their 1873 Winchester shotgun appraised at the NRA's Antiques Guns and Gold Showcase during the National Rifle Association's 142 Annual Meetings and Exhibits at the George R. Brown Convention Center Thursday, May 2, 2013, in Houston. NRA's Antiques Guns and Gold Showcase is a television show that runs on the Sportsman Channel. The 2013 NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits runs from Friday, May 3, through Sunday, May 5. More than 70,000 are expected to attend the event with more than 500 exhibitors represented. The convention will features training and education demos, the Antiques Guns and Gold Showcase, book signings, speakers including Glenn Beck, Ted Nugent and Sarah Palin as well as NRA Youth Day on Sunday. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Johnny Hanson)

Johnny Hanson

AUSTIN, — The National Rifle Association has spent much of the past year under siege, ardently defending gun rights following mass shootings in Colorado and Connecticut and fighting back against mounting pressure for stricter laws in Washington and state capitols across the country.

Now, after winning a major victory over President Barack Obama with the defeat of a gun control bill in the U.S. Senate, the powerful gun-rights lobby will gather in Houston this weekend for its annual convention.

Organizers anticipate a rollicking, Texas-sized party — one that celebrates the group’s recent victory while stressing the fight against gun control is far from over.

“If you are an NRA member, you deserve to be proud,” Wayne LaPierre, the NRA’s brash, no-compromises chief executive wrote to the organization’s 5 million members last week, telling them they “exemplify everything that’s good and right about America.”

The NRA couldn’t have picked a friendlier place to refresh the troops. More than 70,000 people are expected to attend the three-day “Stand and Fight”-themed event, which includes a gun trade show, political rally and strategy meeting.

Texas, with its frontier image and fierce sense of independence, is one of the strongest gun-rights states in the country. More than 500,000 people are licensed to carry concealed handguns, including Gov. Rick Perry, who once bragged about shooting a coyote on a morning jog.

Concealed handguns are allowed in the state Capitol, where simply showing a license allows armed visitors to bypass metal detectors.

Today’s big event is a political forum with speeches from several state and national conservative leaders, including Perry, former GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, former Pennsylvania senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum and Sen. Ted Cruz, a Republican Texas firebrand who has become one of the top tea party voices in Washington since being elected last year. LaPierre speaks to the convention on Saturday before the “Stand and Fight” rally at night.

NRA spokesman Andrew Arulanandam predicted the convention will draw the largest crowd in its history.

“The geography is helpful,” Arulanandam said. “The current (political) climate helps.”