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Water floods the Low Battery during Tropical Storm Irma on September 11, 2017.  Charleston city staff, preparing for the city's first sea-level rise project, will meet with Murray Boulevard residents Wednesday night to share details — when work is expected to begin and what traffic closures may look like. File/Matthew Fortner/Staff

Charleston city staff, preparing for the city's first sea-level rise project, will meet with Murray Boulevard residents Wednesday night to share details — when work is expected to begin and what traffic closures may look like.

The meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Wells Fargo Auditorium on the College of Charleston campus, 5 Liberty St. 

The Low Battery project involves building up the century-old Low Battery seawall 2½ to 3 feet higher to match the height of the High Battery. The work would also would include sturdy posts that could be used to add about 3 more feet of barrier wall in the future for additional protection from storm surge.

New design for Charleston's Low Battery

Charleston has decided that this design would work best for the Low Battery seawall, which has to be repaired and elevated to protect the peninsula from sea-level rise and severe storm surge. Provided/Charleston Design Center

Initial plans to build up the nearly 4,800 feet of seawall were revisited after waves from Hurricane Matthew crashed over the proposed height of the seawall.

Work on the project is expected to begin in early December and span 1,000 feet of Murray Boulevard from Tradd to Ashley streets. The project is expected to take about a year and will not create any permanent road closures, Charleston's director of Stormwater Management Matthew Fountain said. 

City staff will have a finalized traffic plan ready at the meeting, but Fountain said Murray Boulevard residents can expect to have access to their homes during the project, though it may turn into a one-way street at times. Emergency vehicles and delivery trucks will have access to the road, as well. 

Some of the parking along the Low Battery now will be gone when the project is completed. 

Residents can expect to see construction fencing going up in early December and then demolition work shortly after. Work is expected to take place during daytime hours during the workweek. 

"We're trying to keep impacts down for residents as much as possible," Fountain said. 

Given that the Low Battery was constructed roughly 120 years ago, the city will have vibration monitoring in place to make sure the integrity of the historic wall is maintained, Fountain said. 

The city awarded an $11 million contract to Gulfstream Construction, headquartered in Charleston, to manage the work. 

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Reach Mikaela Porter at 843-937-5906. Follow her on Twitter @mikaelaporterPC. 

Mikaela Porter joined The Post and Courier in April 2019 and writes about the city of Charleston. Previously, Mikaela reported on breaking news, local government, school issues and community happenings for The Hartford Courant in Hartford, Conn.