Holiday leftovers

GMLc cleans up the kitchen with a small serving of news bites from the state, the nation and the world.

Bhutto. CNN posted a page of back stories and video interviews, along with the history of the leadership and return to Pakistan of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated Thursday in Rawalpindi (go back to Page 1A). See CNN's coverage at cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/news/benazir.bhutto/index.html. The BBC's breaking news video on television was the most graphic coverage. See www.bbc.co.uk.

New words. The New York Times on Sunday reported that among the new words appearing in the American version of English this year are bromance, a strong friendship between two heterosexual men ... astronaut diaper, the garment worn by astronauts when they are in pressure suits ... bacn, impersonal e-mail that differs from spam only in that you've chosen to receive it ... drama-price, a verb that means to lower the price of a house so as to attract the attention of buyers, and ... global weirding, an increase in freakish weather, earthquakes, hurricanes, new animal migration patterns and so forth that often is attributed to global warming.

Super-Duper Tuesday. Feb. 5, 2008, when 23 states will hold primary elections. Also known as Tsunami Tuesday.

Annals of Improbable Research. The magazine devoted to unlikely, but actual, scientific studies and their findings has gone online. Find it at www.improbable.com. It's free. The current issue is about the 2007 Ig Nobel awards: improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume13/v13i6/v13i6.html. This year's medical prize went to a study on the side effects of sword-swallowing. This year's physics prize went to a study on how sheets become wrinkled. The linguistics prize (our favorite since words are our business) went to two Spanish scientists for documenting that rats sometimes cannot tell the difference between a person speaking Japanese backward and a person speaking Dutch backward.

Garden & Gun. "New York heresy: Editor heads south," headlined The New York Times on Thursday. The subject was Sid Evans, who quit as editor of the hugely popular magazine Field & Stream to become editor of the new Garden & Gun magazine, published by the Evening Post Publishing Co. The word "heresy" is used tongue-in-cheek because New York considers itself the center of the magazine world. Evans, a native of Memphis, Tenn., is commuting to Charleston now but plans to move his family to Sullivan's Island, trading Brooklyn Heights for island life. Welcome to the beach, Mr. Evans.

Top 10. The Bainbridge, Ga., Community News Web site lists the Top 10 Things To Do With A Christmas Tree. No. 1: "Make a bottle tree. Cut all the branches about a foot from the trunk and put wine bottles on them." "My friend in Charleston started that trend in his yard at Folly Beach. It's definitely better with different colored bottles," said Matthew Chappell, a University of Georgia horticulturist.

Nasal irrigation. One of National Public Radio's most e-mailed stories of 2007 was a report from February about nasal irrigation, aka nasal lavage or neti-potting. The process is said to make you feel like you have eaten a lot of wasabi.

Top 7. The British Medical Journal has listed the Top 7 health myths that doctors often accept as truth, Newsweek reported. They include: Reading in dim light hurts your eyesight ... Using cell phones in hospitals is dangerous, and ... We use only 10 percent of our brains.

GMLc