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News
Election managers preparing for the next phase
 10.06.20

After requests were received, Dorchester County is reporting that more than 10,000 absentee ballots are scheduled to go out by mail on Monday Oct. 5, they should begin showing up in mailboxes on Oct. 7.

Berkeley County is reporting ballots will be mailed beginning Oct. 6, as well.

Berkeley County currently has 24,174 absentee requests and 15,728 completed and returned absentee requests. All ballots must be received by the Election Commission no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Registered Berkeley County voters may also vote in-person absentee at the County’s Voter Registration and Elections Office, at 6 Belt Drive, Moncks Corner, SC 29461, through Nov. 2.

The office will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays through Nov. 2 and on Oct. 31, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Extended office hours will be available on Oct. 22 and Oct. 29, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. In-person absentee voting will close at the Voters Registration and Elections Office at 5 p.m. on Nov. 2.

According to a news release from Berkeley County, voting machines will also be available for in-person voting weekdays Oct. 19-30 at the Hanahan Library at 1216 Old Murray Court in Hanahan, SC 29410, and the St. Stephen Library at 113 Ravenell Drive, St. Stephen, SC 29479.

Registered Berkeley County voters may also vote in-person absentee at the County’s Voter Registration and Elections Office, located at 6 Belt Drive, Moncks Corner, SC 29461, starting at 9 a.m. on Oct. 5.

The office will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays through Nov. 2 and on Oct. 31, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Extended office hours will be available on Oct. 22 and Oct. 29, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. In-person absentee voting will close at the Voters Registration and Elections Office at 5 p.m. on Nov. 2.

In Dorchester County, residents can vote in-person absentee through Nov. 2 at the Dorchester County Clemson Extension Office located at 201 Johnston Street in St. George.

Absentee voting will only be available between the hours of 8:30 AM to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

In addition to the above, the Dorchester County Voter Registration and Elections Office will also be open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 31 for in-person absentee voting.

Residents can vote In-Person Absentee 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 19-30 at the Rollins Edwards Community Center at 301 N. Hickory St. in Summerville.

In North Charleston, residents can vote In-Person Absentee 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 19-30 at the Wescott Park Community Center, 9006 Dorchester Road in North Charleston.


Big score, big spirit

The Green Wave cheerleaders had several opportunities to wave the Summerville flag Friday as the football team scored 72 points against Stall.


News
Nexton Elementary School vending machine provides books
 10.02.20

When Nexton Elementary students returned to school this month, there was a new item in the hallway outside of the media center: a vending machine.

However, this vending machine was not stocked with Poptarts or Diet Coke bottles; instead it contains roughly 100 books for all grade levels.

The book vending machine is a product of extra funds from the school’s PTA fundraising efforts last school year. PTA president Shana Bourhill said the group purchased the machine for $5,000 in February. Delivery was delayed because of the pandemic and the machine did not make it into the school until June.

The whole premise was that it would be a surprise to the students.

“It was really just something that the PTA wanted to do to surprise the teachers and the student body,” she said.

The books range from pre-kindergarten through fifth-grade. Bourhill said a majority of the books are chapter-sized but there are also books for students learning how to read.

“There’s really a huge variety in there,” she said.

Bourhill said Media Special Dustin McDonnell has already ordered a new set of replacement books to put in the machine. She said the original plan was that the school could use proceeds from its Book Fair to keep the machine stocked all the time. Bourhill has attained more books through donations from families.

The machine came from Global Vending Services out of New York. The company supplies regular drink and food vending machines but started a new product called Inchy’s Bookworm Vending Machine, where the company refurbishes an old vending machine to hold books instead of snacks and re-programs it to accept tokens instead of money.

The NES machine was customized to feature the school’s logo and mascot.

“I’ve just gotten feedback that they (the students) have been excited,” Bourhill said, adding, “It just gives them something to get excited about when they do their work – something to look forward to.”

The books are free – but a student needs to put a token in the machine to receive a book.

Bourhill said the teachers received tokens that they can give to students – the PTA left it up to the teachers to decide how to reward tokens to students.

Susan Nelson, an ESOL teacher at Nexton Elementary, said students enjoy this new incentive to read.

“They earn tokens for great behavior, listening, following directions…basically for being a standout student,” she said.

Fifth-grade teacher Deanna Jessup said the students seem to enjoy the fact that the books are theirs to keep.

“I watched one student’s face light up when she showed me her book the other day,” she said. “Picking a book like that is also a bit of adventure for them. There’s so many books out there and it expands their exposure. I’ve seen so many students checking out the vending machine and wondering what a certain book is about.”

Virtual students are benefitting from the machine as well. Cynthia Montana teaches fifth-grade virtually. She said her students earn tokens by having great participation and completing their assignments. She uses a participation chart to track their answers and completed assignments on for each day.

At the end of the week on Friday, Montana e-mails the parents and sets up a Google Meet to announce the winner – and brag on how well the students are doing.

“They are loving this reward,” she said. “I have the students come up after school, so they can cash in their coin.”


News
Crowfield Golf Club Executive Chef Mark Kerwood: An artist at work
 10.02.20

There’s a spot just inside the swinging door that separates the dining room from the kitchen at Crowfield Golf Club’s bar & grill. It’s a spot that Executive Chef Mark Kerwood, who joined the Crowfield staff earlier this year, knows well.

“That’s where I’m standing, right by the door,” he said. “When I first send out a special, I’ll stand right there, just looking through the glass to see the customer’s reaction. That’s what does it for me … when they first get their plate, seeing how they react. Seeing the smiles.”

Mark has seen many such smiles during a lifetime behind the stove. He became a professional chef in 1983, but his time cooking began much earlier, when he was growing up in Pennsylvania.

“When you come from a large family, people assume everything is done for you,” he said. “But in my experience, it was the exact opposite: Everyone had to fend for themselves. I started cooking at home when I was 3 or 4 years old.”

By the time he was out of high school, a career choice was clear: He had a passion – and a real talent – for cooking. He traveled to New York and the Culinary Institute of America, where his focus was Italian Cuisine. The school was an incredible experience – but the real prize came outside of the classroom. “I was fortunate,” he said. “I had the opportunity to apprentice for a chef for an entire year, and I learned everything in a functioning restaurant.”

Mark’s decades as a chef include several career stops, and he has also owned two catering companies.

For a while, family obligations led him to explore options outside of cooking. Yet his passion was never far away. “The most rewarding cooking I’ve ever done, is cooking my son’s baby food,” he said with a smile.

Like a great artist, he found himself called back to the empty canvas that is cooking. He remembers going to restaurants during his time away. “I was dismayed by the lack of imagination and talent in the industry … and that drew me back in,” he said. “You have to understand the physics of food, but you have to have an imagination. Creating something brand new – that’s exciting.”

Mark came to the City of Goose Creek from Poogan’s Porch restaurant on Queen Street in downtown Charleston. His weekly specials at Crowfield –announced every Wednesday morning – have proven to be crowd favorites. The bar & grill’s pub menu is available from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

Crowfield Golf Club is located at 300 Hamlet Circle in Goose Creek.