Ways to help your child discover new hobbies

The summer is the perfect opportunity to give kids the chance to explore new interests. Schedules are a little more laid back, so there’s time to experiment with different activities.

First, take note of what your children gravitate toward in their free time. Do they read, make crafts or beg to go swimming? Give them the time and space to focus on those passions.

Next, look for short camps or summer programs that give kids the chance to try something new without a long-term time or financial commitment. If the activity isn’t the best fit, it’s OK because it’s a one-time or one-week session.

Both Kathleen Fox of Creative Arts of Mount Pleasant and Jessica Beran of Dance Moves of Charleston say children should fulfill a commitment – even if they don’t like the activity at first.

Beran says it’s hard to know if you like something after just a session or two. Plus, it’s teaching children the importance of follow through.  

“I have a lot of respect for parents who say, ‘You committed to this for six weeks, so you’re going to see it through,” Fox says. “That’s honoring your word.”

Lastly, parents shouldn’t feel compelled to turn a child’s hobby into an all-encompassing activity. A hobby can simply be something the child enjoys without the need for extra coaching and classes. 

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