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We’ve all done it. Taken our phones out for a quick email check at a stoplight. Scrolled through Instagram or returned a text while waiting for school to let out. Or researched our next kitchen renovation on Pinterest while our little one picks out a book for story time.

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Health officials have highlighted several restaurants across the state with employees that had confirmed hepatitis A infections. But the state health department wants to emphasize that there is more to the outbreak than infected restaurant employees.

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Everybody’s life narrative has losses, hurts and diminishments. The goal of memory work is to overcome obstacles and to be at home with ourselves again.

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Pamela Drukerman starts "Bringing Up Bébé" by explaining how she ended up in Paris, newly married and pregnant. She soon discovered that her new French neighbors approached pregnancy much differently than Americans generally do. 

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“Typically it’s very very small changes every year,"said Kathleen Cartmell a professor and researcher with the Medical University of South Carolina. “It’s very unusual.”

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Multiple studies in multiple health care settings suggest that information flow between the provider (doctor, nurse practitioner, physician’s assistant, etc.) and the patient is frequently limited and ineffective. Research also suggests that we aging amateurs often fail to even get our major concerns on the table. In adult primary care (family and internal medicine, and geriatrics, too), about half the time the caregiver and patient do not agree about what the main complaint or concern is for the visit.

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Aunt Tenny, my grandfather’s oldest sister, had the old family farmhouse close to Louisville, Miss., where we used to go for Caldwell family reunions in the early 1940s.

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Angela Young is one of the first Ms. Wheelchairs the state has had since 2012. The title is given in recognition to the accomplishments of women who use a wheelchair for mobility.

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If you could take a pill to reduce your risk of dying from heart disease and your risk of developing a stroke, coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes and colon cancer by 15-30 percent, I think almost all of us would do it, unless the pill had severe side effects or was too expensive.

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Experts are excited to hear the Trump administration's commitment to ending HIV. But without a cure or vaccine for the virus, some experts want to emphasize the huge challenge its going to be- especially for states like South Carolina with heavy rural communities.