You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
top story

Georgetown County Council approves match for additional Spring Gully drainage funding

180925-Z-OL711-1047 (copy)

In February and March, Spring Gully residents begged council to give them funding from the tax surplus to fix their copious amounts of drainage issues. Many residents said with even small amounts of rain, they have to put on rain boots to simply walk out to their mailbox or buy water pumps to keep the insides of their homes dry.

GEORGETOWN COUNTY — Council adopted a resolution Tuesday night that could give the Spring Gully community $750,000 more to update and fix their extensive drainage issues.

The resolution included a 10 percent match to the $750,000 Community Development Block Grant, and was the final piece needed before the county submitted the application to the federal government. The match money will come from the already $300,000 the community was given as part of the 2014 Capital Project Sales Tax surplus.

In February and March, Spring Gully residents begged council to give them funding from the tax surplus to fix their copious amounts of drainage issues. Many residents said with even small amounts of rain, they have to put on rain boots to simply walk out to their mailbox or buy water pumps to keep the insides of their homes dry.

After originally not allocating the community any funding from the surplus tax, council voted March 23 to give $300,000 to the community. While some residents appreciated getting some money, others were offended by how little they received.

This additional funding is a step in the right direction, Spring Gully resident and president of the Spring Gully Community Action Group Dedric Bonds said.

County council also passed a final approval on a massive solar farm project and voted to rename a road in honor of a former county sheriff at Tuesday night's meeting.

Silicon Ranch, the company in charge of the possible 2,500-acre solar farm off of Saints Delight Road, said it was attracted to this specific plot because of its ability to support the necessary infrastructure, its environmental makeup, community sustainability and its sheer size.

A key benefit of this project is the $300,000 per year in tax revenue it will produce for the city, economic development director Brian Tucker said.

"If we were to generate $300,000 a year of new revenue in single-family homes, then we would be adding that many more cars to the streets, we would add that many more students going to schools that would then be utilizing government services," Tucker said. "And we want that, but if we can get revenue that doesn't tax our services, that's even better."

Next, Silicon Ranch will close on the timber site and will likely have to go through county planning commission and county council once more before ground can be broken later this year, Tucker said.

Sign up for weekly roundups of our top stories, news and culture from the Myrtle Beach area. This newsletter is hand-curated by a member of our Myrtle Beach news staff.


Follow Demi Lawrence on Twitter @DemiNLawrence.

Demi Lawrence reports on Georgetown County for The Post and Courier. She graduated from Ball State University in 2020, and previously was an intern at The Herald Bulletin in Anderson, Indiana and Indianapolis Monthly.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

Columbia Breaking News

Greenville Breaking News

Myrtle Beach Breaking News

Aiken Breaking News

N Augusta Breaking News