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Georgetown considers four-way stop at Wood and Front to precede new parking lot

Wood and Front

The intersection of Wood and Front streets in Georgetown on Sept. 16, 2022. Mike Woodel/Staff

GEORGETOWN — Facing greater foot traffic in the area, and the prospect of new public parking nearby, the city of Georgetown took its first step in making the intersection of Wood and Front streets a four-way stop on Sept. 15. 

The Georgetown City Council unanimously gave first reading approval to the four-way stop, which must be approved by ordinance. The intersection, located at the northwestern edge of Georgetown's Historic District, is currently a two-way stop with stop signs for traffic traveling along Wood Street but not Front Street.

Council members were told that there has been increased foot traffic at the intersection following the opening of a restaurant at the southern end of Wood Street — ostensibly Between the Antlers, which opened earlier this year in a renovated former shrimp house.

"I think this is what one of our residents was just addressing," Georgetown Mayor Carol Jayroe said. "That is a busy intersection, and we have had several residents reach out to us."

As portrayed in documents for the council's Sept. 15 meeting, the project would include the painting of crosswalks.

On Aug. 25, the council approved an application to the S.C. Commerce Department for a $250,000 community development block grant to reduce city construction costs of a 39-space parking lot. The proposed site for the lot, at 113 Cleland St., is just one block from the intersection of Wood and Front streets.

That project, valued at $360,933, would include two spaces considered accessible under the ADA, solar lighting and a charging station for electric vehicles.

Mike Woodel reports on Georgetown County for The Post and Courier. He graduated from the University of South Carolina in 2018 and previously worked for newspapers in Montana and South Dakota.