Blocker

Blocker

Noon, Santee Avenue Stage — Blocker

Blocker’s punchy power pop combines big ’90s choruses with some seriously danceable grooves. Check out “Run Around” for a slice of Aimee Mann mixed with Oasis bombast. It’ll likely run around your head for days. Other songs, like the downtempo single “I Can Feel It,” pair singer Jade Blocker’s metaphysical questioning with funky verses. But she’s more than just a guitarist and a frontwoman, as likely to step behind the kit and slap the skins as she is to stand in front of a mic. — Ethan Fogus

1 p.m., College Street Stage — Dead Swells

Dead Swells defy easy categorization, but this works to the band’s advantage. The path of least resistance is to call them a rock band, which is to say that’s how I’d probably describe them to my grandmother. But these five musicians can get Prince-caliber funky when the spirit so moves them and they’ve just got a better general sense of groove than most bands who aspire to such things. Most importantly, the songs are there. While not riddled with hooks, every track has a distinct personality that goes beyond Dead Swells’ talent for whatever direction takes their fancy. — Michael Spawn

E.Z. Shakes

E.Z. Shakes

1 p.m., Saluda & Blossom Street Stage — E.Z. Shakes

Taken together, E.Z. Shakes’ two 2018 releases — June’s The Wolf LP, November’s Eyes on the Fire EP — bring to mind Bloomed, the debut from vaunted singer-songwriter Richard Buckner. Like Buckner, lead Shake Zach Seibert, gruff and bearded and heavily tattooed and built like a linebacker, cuts an imposing figure. But like Buckner’s, Seibert’s songs, raw and desperate, are weighted by melancholy. Flecked with silvery pedal steel licks and twangy electric guitar filigrees, they throb with ache and anger and loneliness, cutting sharp portraits that shine under any circumstance. — Patrick Wall

Boomtown Waifs

Boomtown Waifs

1 p.m./3 p.m., Santee Avenue Stage — The Post-Timey String Band/The Boomtown Waifs

On the Santee Avenue Stage comes a chance to witness one of Columbia’s more impressive vocalists in divergent contexts. Paired with mercurial multi-instrumentalist Sean Thomson as The Post-Timey String Band, Kelley McLachlan’s sweetly soaring twang serves to contrast the gritty and giddy rough edges of the group’s garage-rocked twists on traditional folk. Bouncing her voice off keen harmonizer and fiddler Kristen Harris and a group of ace backers with The Boomtown Waifs, her voice merges warmly with that of her musical partner, elevating folk-rock that’s winningly unfussed-over and pristinely played. — Jordan Lawrence

2 p.m., Santee Avenue Stage — Sinners & Saints

The robust sound of guitarist Perry Fowler and upright bassist Mark Baran’s slice of life Americana exceeds that of your average pickin’ duo. The Charlotte-based songwriters’ harmonies provide down-home warmth, while their deconstructed rhythm section of Fowler’s kick snare and Baran’s kick drum give a ramshackle feel that can get rowdy at a moment’s notice. Sinners & Saints feel less dramatic than obvious hometown comparison point The Avett Brothers, more apt to talk shop over a beer than give you an English lecture. — Cam Powell

Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba

Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba

2:10 p.m., College Street Stage — Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba

These Jam Room Music Festival veterans from North Carolina provide one of the more joyous musical expressions you’ll ever encounter. Led by Diali Keba Cissokho on kora, a traditional African instrument, the band romps through West African rhythms and melodies while fusing it to American-style funk and blues with righteous fervor. You’re not likely to find a hipper party band on our continent. — Kyle Petersen

H3RO

H3RO

2:10 p.m., Saluda & Blossom Street Stage — H3RO

For a festival that has often had a tentative relationship to hip-hop, local emcee H3RO is an obvious booking. With an energetic flow straight out of the golden era of ’90s hip-hop, the hard-hustling rapper has paired increasingly polished recordings with an increasingly dynamic live presence, pivoting from backpack-and-a-laptop DIY stylings to incorporating a singer and live musicians that he can play off and against. His fresh-faced presence also makes for a nice complement to the other local rapper on the bill, the grizzled St. Pat’s vet Fat Rat da Czar. — Kyle Petersen

High divers kalyn oyer pandc.jpg

The High Divers

3:30 p.m., College Street Stage — The High Divers

Charleston’s The High Divers are this state’s whiskey-and-sorghum-soaked answer to Americana stars like Dawes and Deer Tick. Beefed up by Luke Mitchell’s commanding voice, the quartet’s big sound reaches right for the spot where your soul is. They exude charisma with sounds reminiscent of ’60s AM radio and heartland rock. The band has been through a lot to get here — a car accident, long tours, and a whole lot of broken strings — so make ‘em feel welcome. — Ethan Fogus

The Band Camino

The Band Camino

5 p.m., College Street Stage — The Band Camino

St. Pat’s in Five Points isn’t the only festival The Band Camino is playing this year. In May, it’s on a side stage at Kaaboo Texas. In early July, the wavy Memphis pop-rock band will play Louisville’s Forecastle Festival; two weeks later, it’s on the lineup of Detroit’s Mo Pop Festival. And in September, it’ll play the Moon River Music Festival in Chattanooga, Tennessee. It’s an endorsement that the young trio’s tunes — genial, affable, breezy, radio-ready — are already built for big stages. — Patrick Wall

Bonus: 4:15 p.m., The White Mule — Josh Roberts and the Hinges

Within the gates of St. Pat’s, you’ll find many spots hosting unofficial stages. Josh Roberts and his Hinges are a familiar name among these bonus offerings, and for good reason. The Charleston-via-Columbia musician sings songs that are a little bit country and a little bit Crazy Horse, and his bendy, groovy backers have for years owned the now increasingly common middle ground between vibey indie rock and tidied jam band-isms. Their sound is a cross-section of pretty much every St. Pat’s staple, which makes them a fine band for The White Mule, newly reopened in Five Points, to lean on for The Breakthru Sessions, its all-day fest-within-a-fest. Later in the evening, the Mule keeps the party going with the Mumford-y Arizona rock band Jared & the Mill and local mainstay BC Villanova, taking the time after his eponymous main band’s 12th appearance on an official St. Pat’s stage to play with His Amazing Friends. Entry to The Breathru Sessions costs $5. — Jordan Lawrence

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