Columbia event highlights: Feb. 5-12

Wednesday 5

We’ve spilled a lot of ink about Wicked being cool — for real, though, seeing “Defying Gravity” live is awesome — and that having a musical of its stature in town could help us get other things — such as The Lion King, which will follow as another legit blockbuster musical tour in the 2021-22 season for Broadway in Columbia at the Koger Center. So for now, we’ll just focus on telling you that your chances to see Wicked in Soda City are quickly drying up. The show runs through Feb. 9 at Koger, with tonight’s performance starting at 7:30 p.m. Tickets range from $39 to $119. Find out more at broadwayincolumbia.com. — Jordan Lawrence

[Online copy corrected.]

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TRIBE: A Celebration of South Carolina Hip-Hop Culture opens Thursday at the Columbia Museum of Art.

Thursday 6

Last fall, Columbia hip-hop scene leader Fat Rat da Czar, delivered TRIBE, a sprawling, double-album opus featuring a wide array of South Carolina talent, and focused on displaying the talent and history the state possesses within the genre. This week, the Columbia Museum of Art debuts the exhibition that inspired the album, a mixed-media look at hip-hop in the Palmetto State curated by Czar. The TRIBE exhibition will feature visual art, audio elements and artifacts from S.C. hip-hop history. Tonight, as part of the monthly First Thursday on Main art crawl, the museum will hold an opening celebration hosted hosted by Non-Stop Hip-Hop Live’s DJ Kingpin VOV and Sherard “Shekeese” Duvall, who will begin the event, per a release, by “spinning a South Carolina-only playlist and sharing an historical overview of the state’s hip-hop legacy.” The free event gets going at 5:30 p.m. For more on TRIBE, which runs through April 12, head to columbiamuseum.org. To see what else is on tap for this month’s First Thurday, go to firstthursdayonmain.com. — Jordan Lawrence

Claflin University, a historically black college in Orangeburg founded after the Civil War, has an illustrious history in many respects, and one of them is its long-running art and design program. The opening reception for the University’s Faculty Art Exhibition is today at the Arthur Rose Museum and is a welcome showcase of the studio work and graphic design expertise that its professorship is passing down to the next generation. The exhibition runs through Feb. 28. Head to claflin.edu for more info. — Kyle Petersen

Friday 7

Just like the biergartens in Germany, Bierkeller Columbia embraces the winter chill, such as it is in this town, with tonight’s Bockbieranstich and Winterfest, running from 5:30 to 10 p.m. at Swamp Cabbage Brewing Company. The traditional Franconian celebration marks the ceremonial tapping of the first keg of bock beer, a favorite winter brew of Germans. This is a new beer for Bierkeller, which promises pale, clean lager that can warm you up with its 6.7 percent ABV. There will also be a new interpretation of the German traditionalist’s Helles Lagerbier, tweaked to be “a bit hoppier and slightly more rustic,” and a fresh batch of the always tasty Kellerbier pouring straight from the lager tanks. Head to facebook.com/bierkellercolumbia for more info. — Tug Baker

The New York Jazz Quartet is from the Big Apple, duh, but that’s about the only easily pegged facet of its sound. Rather than doing the typical tenor sax-piano-bass-drums lineup, the musicians, Zaid Nasser, Stefano Doglioni, Sam Edwards and Jim Hall, branch out a bit, using alto sax and bass clarinet as their frontline instruments. That’s a wide range of sounds at their disposal, which means that their show at The Aristocrat probably won’t be your average jazz set. Showtime is 8 p.m., and the show is free. Visit colajazz.com for more info. — Vincent Harris

The CWWY visual arts contingent (Stephen Chesley, Mike Williams, Edward Wimberly and David Yaghjian) has been presenting joint shows now for two decades, allowing Columbia patrons to watch the close relationships between the four masters evolve on the canvas over the years in a manner both telling and surprising. The quartet is joined in this show at Stormwater Studios by two additional artists, Ellen Emerson Yaghjian and Guy Allison, sympathetic characters in this grand story.  Opening reception goes from 5 to 9 p.m. tonight. Find out more at stormwaterstudios.org. — Kyle Petersen

Saturday 8

I mean, do we really have to sell you on an event called Sword Fest? It’s five hours of experts imparting their sword-y knowledge, a tour of something called the Gallery of Swords, and combat demonstrations, including fencing from the Columbia Fencing Club and Bokken (Japanese wooden sword) demos from the University of South Carolina Aikido Club. So head on over to the S.C. Confederate Relic Room & Military Museum’s event starting at 10 a.m. and watch people poking each other with sharp things. Admission is free. Visit crr.sc.gov if you need more info for some reason. — Vincent Harris

Sunday 9

Around these parts, anyway, the Nickelodeon Theatre’s annual watch party for those film awards where they give out the little gold men, its Red Carpet Awards Gala, is as much a rite as the Oscars themselves. As usual, the evening is hosted by the indomitable Patti O’Furniture, and this year she’s accompanied by co-host Alexia B. Draggin. As usual, there’s food (provided by Hudson’s Classic Catering) and drink, trivia and spirited live entertainment. And, as usual, you’re encouraged to bring your A-game, fashion- and quip-wise. The red carpet rolls out at 6:30 p.m.; tickets are $50, or $40 for Nick members. Visit nickelodeon.org for more information. — Patrick Wall

The USC theater department is tackling Eurydice, but it’s not what you think. The classic tragic Greek myth has been reimagined by playwright Sarah Ruhl from the heroine’s perspective, spending time with the title character herself as she slides into the underworld rather than on her husband’s heroic musical efforts to win her back. The New York Times has called it one of the best plays of the last 25 years, and it’s a chance to see some of the immersive visual and sound design work of some USC’s brightest graduate students. The show opens Friday at 8 p.m. and runs through Feb. 22, including a 3 p.m. performance today. Head to theatre.sc.edu for show times and ticket prices. — Kyle Petersen

Monday 10

Taste some of the best of the west as Portland, Oregan, native Chef Mike Perez joins the F2T Productions team of chefs for one night at the February Harvest Dinner at City Roots. Perez, who most recently cooked in the Lowcountry at Indaco and Cannon Green, will draw on his experience cooking all over the country to serve a dinner featuring local, seasonal ingredients. Tickets are $75 per person for a four-course, family-style dinner experience. More info available at f2tproductions.com. — April Blake

Tuesday 11

Horror Noire isn’t just about black horror films. It’s about how the horror genre reflects and connects with black history — how the image of white mobs murdering black men in D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation was an explicit threat, how black people were represented in early white horror films as little more than savages, how blaxploitation films opened new avenues for black actors but codified stereotypes, how Get Out reconfigured how audiences contextualize the world and its terrors. The Nickelodeon Theatre screens the documentary at 6:30 p.m. as part of its For the Record series; visit nickelodeon.org for more information. — Patrick Wall

Wednesday 12

Mid-February seems a little early for the University of South Carolina Dance Company’s Spring Concert. The vernal equinox isn’t for more than a month yet, after all. But Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring, and we’re already at the mid-semester mark, so why not? This year’s spring concert is, as ever, packed with innovative contemporary choreography; the concert starts at 7:30 p.m. tonight at Drayton Hall and performances continue through Saturday. Tickets are $22. Visit dance.sc.edu for more information. — Patrick Wall

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