top story
  • Updated

How could I tell my wife that I wanted to go to Iraq to fathom the sorrow that had become my job to understand, not just regret? More than that, I wanted to tell families that I had seen how their loved ones handled the act of dying. 

top story
  • Updated

We feel safer living in a California community that implements “fire-wise” practices in spite of living with a few inconveniences like my jammed electric recliner and no TV to watch.

top story

My doubts used to worry me a bit, but as I’ve aged I’ve come to see those doubts as an honest wrestling match, the kind of struggle that sharpens my wit, keeps my mind open and builds my spiritual strength.

top story

I’m a chaplain who doesn’t always like to go to church. Truthfully, some churches make me uncomfortable.

If you are honest with yourself today, I suspect you sometimes recognize the deceptive voice of privilege. It’s the voice we use when we insist that people accept us simply because we’re a Christian, or because our family is rich, or because we speak English or because we are tall white men. Or because we are a chaplain.

top story

While hospice sometimes happens in a hospital, my work happens in a patient’s home. I join a team of social workers, nurses, aids and volunteers who provide comfort to people in their final six months of life.

top story

Have you ever been in such physical pain that it gave others a bad impression of you? If so, you’re definitely not alone in this reaction. I’ve been there, too.