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A short series of documentary films about Gullah-Geechee culture will be presented 2-4 p.m. Saturday, April 27, at Johns Island Regional Library, 3531 Maybank Hwy.

AP

After four well-received novels about LAPD homicide cop Elouise “Lou” Norton, Rachel Howzell Hall confidently delivers a highly entertaining stand-alone that pays homage to Agatha Christie while finding its own individual approach.

AP

Charles Jenkins has left his time in the CIA far behind and now lives with his family on a farm on a remote island in Washington state. His wife is expecting their second child, and he runs a security consulting business to pay the bills. When financial issues force him to contemplate how to…

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What do we call people with certain physical or mental challenges? The old word, now considered disparaging, was “handicapped.” A more recent, and generally more acceptable, word is “disabled.” But that’s not necessarily accurate. It’s a negative word, one that refers to a shortcoming or lim…

Adam Tate’s new book “Catholics’ Lost Cause” is a welcome addition to the scholarship on the history of religion in the South. Tate explores the efforts of three antebellum Catholic bishops, John England, Ignatius Reynolds and Patrick Lynch, to convince Southerners, and South Carolinians in particular, that Catholics were good Americans as well as good Southerners.

Author Patrick K. O'Donnell's "Band of Brothers"-style chronicle details the exploits of various aggregates of Maryland's citizen soldiers, not only the 400 men who saved the army from annihilation at the Battle of Brooklyn, but those who turned the tide in many a critical battle, becoming the first elite unit of the Continental army. Fighting in both North and South, these “Immortals” proved to be Gen. George Washington's most trusted force.

When he wasn't composing operas or incidental music, the great Baroque-era composer George Frideric Handel wrote oratorios. These were unstaged opera-like works that featured big choruses, typically relied on narratives from the Old Testament and could be performed in churches and cathedrals.

LOS ANGELES — Hal Blaine, the Hall of Fame session drummer and virtual one-man soundtrack of the 1960s and ’70s who played on the songs of Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and the Beach Boys and laid down one of music’s most memorable opening riffs on the Ronettes’ “Be My Baby,” died Monday. 

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After he died in January 2017, his parents knew what they had to do. They had to help finish the film. Rob Stewart, a conservationist and activist filmmaker, had generated 400 hours of footage for his movie “Sharkwater Extinction,” a follow-up to his 2006 groundbreaking documentary “Sharkwater.”