Carnival Ecstasy (copy) (copy)

The Carnival Ecstasy typically sails between the Port of Charleston and the Bahamas. File/Provided

The Bahamas government is apparently sick and tired of cruise ship passengers who stay on board during port calls to the archipelago nation.

So it has decided to no longer provide financial incentives to cruise lines that dock at places like Freeport and Nassau.

"To be quite honest with you, we were paying for a lot of people who didn’t come off the boat," said Dionisio D’Aguilar, the country's minister of tourism.

The Bahamas — the most frequent destination for Carnival Cruise Line ships that leave from the Port of Charleston — had been paying about $12 million a year to cruise lines that visit the islands, D'Aguilar told The Nassau Guardian newspaper.

If any future incentive program is created, he said, it will be tied to the number of passengers who actually get off the ship — not those who stay on board for the free buffets and shows.

D'Aguilar said the government's new focus will be on "providing better experiences for cruise passengers when they visit" — apparently something travelers would welcome, according to reviews of the Bahamas on the Cruise Critic website. Many of those reviews complain about the lack of attractions in the Bahamas and aggressive hair braiders and other vendors who hang out at the cruise terminals.

"Nassau and Freeport are dump ports," Cruise Critic user donaldsc said on a post about the Bahamas' decision to quit paying cruise lines. "Maybe that is the reason that people don't get off the ship."

"We try to avoid Nassau and Freeport," said another user named teknoge3k, adding: "We stay on the ship as well."

Engine failure

A Rolls Royce supplier wants to talk to Boeing Co. workers in North Charleston about a 2015 accident that caused an engine to catch on fire, resulting in damage to a 787-9 Dreamliner.

Elma, N.Y.-based Servotronics Inc. has filed a request in federal court in Charleston to interview three employees of the planemaker who took part in testing and trouble-shooting of the Trent 1000 engine prior to the fire.

The interviews would be used in an arbitration hearing between London-based Rolls Royce and Servotronics, which built a defective valve for the engine that was installed on a plane that was later delivered to Virgin Atlantic Airways.

Boeing is not a part of the arbitration process, which is being held in London.

Rolls Royce paid Boeing $12.8 million for damages to the plane and now it wants to recover that money from Servotronics, which it blames for the accident. Servotronics says the accident was caused by "numerous improper, inadequate and incorrect actions and failures to act" by Rolls Royce and Boeing workers on site at the time.

A federal judge has not yet ruled on Servotronics' request to interview the three North Charleston workers. Servotronics also wants Boeing to turn over documents related to the accident and its settlement agreement with Rolls Royce.

Up for bids

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One of the last large pieces of excess property owned by the State Ports Authority is up for sale.

The Jack Primus Tract — a roughly 162-acre parcel off Clements Ferry Road in Berkeley County — will be sold to the bidder providing the best value to the maritime agency, which operates the Port of Charleston

The land adjacent to Charleston Regional Business Center is being advertised at scspa.com/port-properties with each bid requiring a $200,000 deposit.

The property has a market value of nearly $4.4 million, according to county property records.

Bidding ends at 2 p.m. on Nov. 30 and the authority plans to name a buyer in January.

Jim Newsome, the SPA's chief executive officer, has said he wants the agency to shed all of the excess property it isn't using for port-related business purposes.

"But it takes a bidder and it takes the right price," he said.

Reach David Wren at 843-937-5550 or on Twitter at @David_Wren_