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No fuel sheen, no sign that hull is breached

  • Updated
No fuel sheen, no sign that hull is breached

In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, the mobile drilling unit Kulluk is towed by the tugs Aiviq and Nanuq in 29 mph winds and 20-foot seas 116 miles southwest of Kodiak City, Alaska, Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012. The crews remain stationed with the drill rig Kulluk Sunday 20 miles from Alaska's Kodiak Island as they wait in rough seas for another tug boat to arrive. The Coast Guard says the goal is to tow the Kulluk to a safe harbor and determine the next step. (AP Photo/U.S Coast Guard, Chris Usher)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Officials say two aircraft that flew over an oil drilling ship that went aground off an island in a severe Alaska storm have not seen any signs that the vessel is leaking fuel or that its hull had been breached.

Federal on-scene response coordinator Capt. Paul Mehler says the rig is aground but appears to be stable on Tuesday.

When the storm eases and weather permits, the plan is to get marine experts onboard the Kulluk to take photos and videos, and then come up with a more complete salvage plan.

The Kulluk is carrying 150,000 gallons of diesel and about 12,000 gallons of lube oil and hydraulic fluid. The rig ran aground Monday on a sand and gravel shore off an uninhabited island in the Gulf of Alaska.