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Nuclear nonprofit CNTA notches successful year despite pandemic challenges

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James Marra, Up & Atom

Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness Executive Director Jim Marra, far right, explains what the nuclear-focused nonprofit does during a Thursday morning virtual forum.

Despite challenges presented by the coronavirus crisis, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness has this year seen growth and prosperity.

The Aiken-area nonprofit – focused on, as its name suggests, nuclear education, demystification, networking and general outreach – has notched several successes, including a major fundraiser securing more than $17,000.

“It was a great event, and, as always, this is going to support our education, our outreach, our scholarship programs, our grants programs,” Executive Director Jim Marra said Thursday during an online forum, Up & Atom. “And, again, a great day of fellowship and meeting and getting to know each other as well as raising a lot of money.”

In May, CNTA’s Twitter reach boomed, and over the summer the nonprofit’s Facebook footprint jumped 200%. Its website has seen a steady increase in visits, as well.

“From the communications standpoint, 2020 has been a different year, but kind of the same year. Meaning that, OK, there are fewer events, but we still have to do press releases and things,” said Dean Campbell, who is on CNTA’s board and handles communications for Savannah River Site liquid-waste contractor Savannah River Remediation. “One of the things we’ve tried to concentrate on in the last year, year and a half, is our social media.”

The word is spreading, Campbell added, which is great for the organization and the nuclear industry.

For more information about CNTA, visit cntaware.org.

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