John England arrived in Charleston on Dec. 30, 1820, after an arduous ocean voyage that began in Belfast two months prior. A dashing young Iri…

Designed by architect Frank P. Milburn, the James S. Gibbes Memorial Art Gallery, today the Gibbes Museum of Art, opened to the public on Apri…

Since its early decades, the people of Charleston have had great interest in history, culture and the arts. This interest was manifested in th…

Nic Butler’s Charleston Time Machine

About Charleston Time Machine

The Charleston Time Machine is an imaginary time-travel device created by historian Dr. Nic Butler. It uses stories and facts from the rich, deep, colorful history of Charleston, South Carolina, as a means to educate, inspire, amuse, and even amaze the minds of our community. By exploring the stories of our shared past, we can better understand our present world and plan more effectively for the future.

Anyone who lives west of the Ashley River, or has spent time traveling through that area is familiar with the name of Bee’s Ferry, and the rel…

From the Archives

Jamie Westendorff pulls down a hand-blown bottle from among his collection of thousands of bottles found around Charleston that date back more…

It will be remembered by our readers that we published, last summer, the proceedings of a fourth of July celebration at Eutaw Springs, at whic…

February 4, 1860- Representatives of six seceded states meet in Montgomery, Ala., to discuss a new confederation

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Lowcountry History

The Carolina colony’s long, acrimonious divorce from the Lords Proprietors, chronicled in Sunday’s installment of the history serial, was not …