Riley, Veeck highlight Charleston Baseball Hall class

Former Mayor Joe Riley,for whom the RiverDogs’ ball park is named, will be part of a five-person class for the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame.

Former Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., Charleston RiverDogs president emeritus Mike Veeck, broadcaster Ted Byrne and College of Charleston standouts Chris Campbell and Nick Chigges comprise the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame’s Class of 2016.

Byrne, Campbell and Chigges were selected by fan voting; Riley and Veeck were chosen by the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame Committee.

The five, which represent the largest class in the 14-year history of the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame, will be enshrined Aug. 25 prior to the RiverDogs’ home game against the Columbia Fireflies, which begins at 7:05 p.m.

Riley, who served as Charleston’s mayor from 1975 to 2016, is a native of Charleston and a graduate of The Citadel and the University of South Carolina School of Law. Among his many projects as mayor was the completion of the $19 million baseball field that bears his name on the banks of the Ashley River.

Veeck, the son of Baseball Hall of Famer Bill Veeck, brought his innovative “Fun Is Good” mantra to the RiverDogs when the club moved from College Park to Riley Park in the late 1990s and has kept that momentum going. Veeck directed the RiverDogs front office as the team continually set attendance records that hovered around the 300,000 per year mark.

Byrne brought Charleston its first sports talk radio show and has been a sports broadcaster since 1967. He currently is the Operations and Traffic Manager for Kirkman Broadcasting and oversees all six of their radio stations. In 1984, he was named South Carolina’s Broadcaster of the Year. After Hurricane Hugo in 1989, Byrne was part of a group that won his industry’s highest award, The Peabody Award, which recognizes distinguished and meritorious public service by radio and television broadcasters. Byrne has been the “voice” of The Citadel and College of Charleston, and has worked TV broadcasts for Fox Sports, SportSouth, Comcast and ESPN.

Campbell, who played second base for the College of Charleston from 2004-07, ranks as the program’s all-time leader in games played, hits, doubles and RBIs. In 2007, Campbell led the nation in RBIs per game with 1.41. His 87 RBIs in 2005 ranked second in Southern Conference history behind C of C’s Matt Leeds’ mark of 88. Campbell’s 290 career RBIs are tied for first in SoCon history, while his 355 career hits are tied for second in the league record books. Campbell was the 2004 SoCon Freshman of the Year, while earning First Team All-SoCon honors in 2005 and Second Team All-Conference accolades in 2004, 2006 and 2007. He helped Charleston to three NCAA Regional appearances and a Super Regional berth in 2006. Chigges was a two-time Southern Conference Pitcher of the Year and collected first team All-Conference accolades in 2006 and 2007. Named co-MVP of the 2006 SoCon Tournament, Chigges earned Second-Team All-America honors in 2006 and 2007. He had a 31-5 career record and a .861 winning percentage, and when he finished, the 31 wins ranked first all-time at CofC and fifth in SoCon history. Chigges was drafted by the New York Yankees and played for the 2008 Charleston RiverDogs.

Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame

2016

Ted Byrne

Chris Campbell

Nick Chigges

Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr.

Mike Veeck

2015

Pete Ayoub

John Chalus

Lee Curtis

2014

Reese Havens

David Hoffman

Billy Swails, Jr.

2013

Steven Jackson

Drew Meyer

Britt Reames

2012

Gettys Glaze

Tom Hatley

John Rhodes

2011

Bill Ackerman

Roberto Alomar

Mike Kimbrell

2010

Lee Glaze

Fred Jordan

D.K. Walters

Kenny Wilkinson

2009

John Dodds, Jr.

W.S. “Bull” Durham

Donald Morillo

Doug Pounder

2008

Bryce Florie

Danny Jones

Charley Smith

Richard Wieters

2007

1955 Cannon Street YMCA All-Star Team

1990 Citadel World Series Team

Anthony Jenkins

Modie Risher

2006

Ty Cline

Mike Cook

Gary McJunkin

Chal Port

2005

John Candelaria

2004

David Cone

2003

Willie Randolph

Gorman Thomas