- Rabbis from across Asia last week celebrated the reopening of a Jewish center targeted by rampaging Pakistani gunmen who stormed through Mumbai on a 60-hour killing spree in 2008.

The attacks on the Chabad center and other iconic locations in India's financial capital left 166 people dead. Among them were six people from the orthodox Jewish center, including Rabbi Gavriel Holtzberg and his wife. Their infant son escaped in the arms of his Indian nanny, and the two now live in Israel.

Rabbi Israel Kozlovsky, who now runs the Mumbai center, said the rebuilt six-story Nariman House would house a $2.5 million Jewish Museum as well as Mumbai's first memorial to those killed in the attacks, which also targeted a train station, a popular tourist cafe and the luxury Taj Mahal hotel.

The building's memorial includes a re-creation of the slain rabbi's home and videos about Jewish culture, according to the lead designer, Nick Appelbaum.

"This is the day we can celebrate their lives and the message of light that they spread," the slain rabbi's father, Rabbi Nachman Holtzberg, said through a translator to a roomful of rabbis who had traveled from centers across Asia set up by the orthodox Jewish group Chabad-Lubavitch.