The art of learning

During the 1980s the personal computer changed the way we work and live, creating opportunities never dreamed possible.

Our society can have another wave of creating opportunity more powerful than the PC via public education and workplace leadership.

Today, the public education system inspires maybe 30 percent of our students to develop a love to learn. This is the group that becomes visionaries and entrepreneurs.

That leaves 70 percent who stay with the status quo. What if our education system inspired a life-long love to learn for all students? The former status-quo people would become visionaries, too, many becoming entrepreneurs with ideas never dreamed possible.

Today's public education teaches to the test. Common Core does not motivate or inspire a love to learn; it does just the opposite, learning is something to escape from.

When former students' current skills become obsolete, they are on the street with no hope.

They never learned the art of learning how to learn.

Bob Webb

Ibis Lane

Goose Creek

This is war

The extremist group ISIS made a declaration of war against the United States by beheading the captured American journalist, James Foley, which it videotaped.

President Obama came off the golf course to send a three minute message about the murder. He called the extremist group a cancer on the Middle East and condemned the senseless killing of James Foley. The president then went back to finish his round of golf.

British Prime Minister David Cameron, in contrast, rushed back to London to have a Cabinet meeting at 10 Downing St. The prime minister called the beheading deeply shocking,

If ISIS is a cancer on the Middle East then why are the United Nations and the United States not doing more to eradicate the disease sweeping Iraq and Syria? ISIS is the Middle East's Ebola outbreak that has no cure today.

Dennis L. Compton

Filly Court

North Charleston

Support for Israel

Over 400 people attended the "We Stand with Israel" community rally sponsored by the Charleston Jewish Federation on Aug. 17. This rally was organized to support Israel in its conflict with Hamas, which has been firing rockets at Israel and digging tunnels with the intent of killing and kidnapping Israelis.

It was also to raise money to support humanitarian services for families in at-risk Israeli communities.

The Aug. 18 Post and Courier article covering the rally contained inaccuracies which need to be corrected. First, the paper reported that the current war between Israel and Hamas started "July 7 with an exchange of rocket fire after Israeli planes damaged a tunnel dug by Hamas from inside the Gaza Strip."

It actually started in June when three Israeli teens were kidnapped and killed on the West Bank by Hamas. While investigating this tragedy, Israel discovered tunnels reaching well into Israel's sovereign territory.

It bears noting that as Israel systematically destroyed these tunnels, it found their points of origin in private homes, mosques, hospitals and other areas in Gaza populated by civilians.

Second, the article included comments by a member of the Central Mosque in Charleston. According to the story, he said the Palestinian people were "more or less unarmed" while fighting the Israeli army.

One can only assume that including this quote was an attempt at "fair and balanced reporting."

In fact, it was neither. Hamas, which controls Gaza, is well equipped with rockets. Hamas has launched over 2,300 rockets into Israel that were not aimed at military targets; in fact, they are not aimed at all.

Given the complexities of the issues and their importance, we were disappointed by the article. We hope that the paper will provide better coverage for future programs.

Larry Freudenberg

Co-Chairman

Charleston Jewish Community Relations Council

Wallenberg Boulevard

Charleston

Pray for America

The Aug. 24 Post and Courier offered a wonderful article on several large Episcopal churches in New York. My local church has enjoyed having two former priests become priests at Trinity, and one became bishop of our diocese.

The beauty and giving are historical truths we all can be proud of. The eye-opener was the $3 billion net worth of Trinity and St. Paul's.

I pray every day for our diocese and the national Episcopal Church. As I study the teachings of our 39 articles and especially Jesus' teachings, I realize the church has lost the spiritual vigor it once lived.

In my humble opinion believers of all faiths need to pray daily for a spiritual revival in America. We don't need to judge others, we need God's hand in all our decisions.

Jack Cranwell

Gin House Court

Charleston