The only Boeing airplane that will be built exclusively in North Charleston has landed a supplier.

An aerospace division of Connecticut-based United Technologies Corp. said it has been picked to design and manufacture external engine housings for the 787-10, the newest and longest version of the Dreamliner jet.

UTC spokesman Andrew Martin said parts for the engine housings, or nacelles, are made around the globe.

The company did not say where they those components will be assembled for delivery to the Boeing South Carolina campus.

"That has not been determined yet," Martin said in an email.

Boeing did not repond to requests for comment Tuesday.

UTC Aerospace Systems' aerostructures business supplies more than 20 other parts for the expanding Dreamliner fleet, including nacelles, inlets, thrust reversers, fan cowls and exhaust systems.

The new coverings will be designed for both the GE Aviation GEnx and Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 engines.

UTC aerostructures also will provide aftermarket support of the 787-10 nacelles.

"After being part of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner journey from concept to production for the past 10 years, we're gratified Boeing has selected us to continue the next leg with them," UTC executive Marc Duvall said in a written statement.

Boeing announced last week it will build the biggest version of the twin-aisle Dreamliner only in North Charleston starting in 2017.

The other two smaller versions of the 787 - the Dash 8 and Dash 9 models - are produced in North Charleston and Everett, Wash., respectively.

The first 787-9 is expected to be fully assembled in North Charleston this fall.

The 787-10 is the largest jet in the fleet, nearly 225 feet long, with a range up to 7,000 nautical miles. It can carry 323 passengers, and Boeing claims it is 20 percent more fuel efficient than similar-sized aircraft.

Because of its length, Boeing decided to build it in North Charleston rather than Everett. The midbody fuselage, which is assembled near Charleston International Airport, will be too long to transport to Washington for assembly, Boeing said.

Reach Warren L. Wise at 937-5524 or twitter.com/warrenlancewise.