U.S. stocks fell for a second day Friday, adding to the massive sell-off the day before and giving the market its worst week in two years.

Investors found little reason to move money into stocks, faced with the growing geopolitical concerns in Israel and Ukraine, as well as banking problems in Europe.

For the last two years, investors have generally wanted to step in to buy any major fall in the stock market, traders said, causing any sell-off to be met the following day with modest buying. Traders said that the selling Friday, on top of what happened the day before, is not a good sign.

"The follow-through from yesterday's (market drop) is very telling," said Jonathan Corpina, a trader on the New York Stock Exchange with Meridian Equity Partners. "The end of this week could not come at a better time as the weekend might provide some stability."

On Friday, the Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 5.52 points to 1,925.15. The index fell 2.7 percent this week, its worst weekly performance since June 2012.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 69.93 points to 16,493.37. That's on top of the 317-point drop the index had Thursday. The Nasdaq composite fell 17.13 points to 4,352.64.

Energy and financial stocks were among the biggest decliners. Chevron, the nation's second-largest oil and gas company behind Exxon Mobil, fell $1.34 to $127.90. While Chevron's earnings were better than analysts had predicted, the company's oil and gas production fell in the quarter. Exxon also reported lower production when it released its own results Thursday.

Banking stocks also fell. JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs all slid roughly 2 percent.

Investors did get some good news about the U.S. economy. The Labor Department said that U.S. employers created 209,000 jobs in July. The unemployment rate rose to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent. July was the sixth-straight month that U.S. employers created more than 200,000 jobs, a sign that the U.S. economy continues to recover. Economists also pointed out that the rise in the unemployment rate was likely due to more out-of-work people actively looking for jobs.

"In a nutshell, it's a good report," said Dan Greenhaus, chief strategist at brokerage firm BTIG in New York. "Not too hot, not too cold."

The good news on the economy also means the Federal Reserve isn't going to be there to hold investors' hands for much longer. The central bank said Wednesday it would cut back its bond-buying program again, and investors now believe the Fed is looking to raise interest rates starting next year.

The Fed's stimulus efforts, combined with the growing U.S. economy, have helped push the stock market higher. The last time U.S. stocks had a correction, meaning a decline of 10 percent or more in a benchmark index like the S&P 500, was nearly three years ago. They typically happen every 18 months.

Proctor & Gamble was among the day's winners. The stock rose $2.33 to $79.65.