Consult with best

At some point in time, greater minds than mine will resolve the I-26 corridor situation. Several wonderful ideas have been raised over the last several months by Post and Courier readers.

While I am not a tree hugger nor an engineer, I understand that the prime criterion for a meaningful solution is to address the root cause of the problem.

Understandably, saving lives is a higher calling. The solution in all likelihood will require a multifaceted approach. Taking out the trees seems simple. Redesigning the road is certainly more complex. Changing driver behavior would likely be a nightmare.

However, these are all lines of thought that need to be addressed if we are going to have any chance of success.

In recent remarks Gov. Nikki Haley cited incredible, growing and thriving businesses in the state - Boeing, BMW and Michelin among them. If the powers that be could gather a few creative spirits from these and other companies as "loaned executives" to spend a couple of days in an "innovation summit" to address the I-26 problem, we would generate multiple potential solutions. In addition, they might suggest new processes and product ideas that could further business development in South Carolina.

Let's leverage the intellectual capital within South Carolina in engineering, materials, software development, systems, sustainability and other functions to find a "game changer" for the I-26 problem.

Bringing people together from disparate technical backgrounds with a common purpose, especially to save lives, should be a mission in which everyone can easily become engaged.

Sam Dolinsky

Privateer Creek Road

Seabrook Island

'Culture of sex'

Your Dec. 15 article, "Culture of Sex," which generalized about the U.S. Coast Guard based on reported incidents aboard the cutter Gallatin, would have been much more interesting and objective if the issue had been thoroughly researched.

Every institution across our country, especially those comprised mostly of young people, deals with issues of excessive drinking, sexual harassment and sometimes violence and assault. What is important is what they do about it.

As the concerned parent of a career Coast Guard woman who has served on ships for almost 20 years, I am aware of the considerable actions the Coast Guard is taking to not only punish those who commit sexual harassment or assault - such as in the recent and upcoming court martials - but actually prevent it.

The story could have explored whether the rising rates of reported assaults are because victims feel more comfortable speaking up due to increased awareness of reporting methods and command involvement, rather than assume an increase in actual assaults.

The command cadre of a large Coast Guard cutter similar to Gallatin published an article in the August issue of the U.S. Naval Institute's Proceedings magazine called "It's All About the Bystanders," in which they discuss why highly trained service members often fail to stop or report misconduct and violations and, more importantly, what they are doing about it.

It described how they are actively working to prevent a "culture of sex" as you suggest existed aboard Gallatin.

Even with the departure of the Dallas and the Gallatin, the Coast Guard will continue to have an important presence in the Charleston area, especially with the arrival next fall of the Hamilton, a brand new 418-foot national security cutter, to be followed by a second ship, the James.

We owe it to these military men and women, who risk their lives for us, to learn more about the challenges they face and the responses they are taking to address issues such as sexual assault.

It is not enough to say the service has a problem, nor is it fair to generalize that one cutter's presumed climate represents the entire Coast Guard. To be fair, identify the specific issues facing the Coast Guard as a whole, and then discuss how they are dealing with it.

Margaret Monthan

Plantation House Road

Summerville

Making a billion

Do you have a desire to be a billionaire?

1) Design a solution which could be added to an IV that would break down plaque in arteries. The patient would be on a dialysis type unit that would filter all dissolved plaque thus preventing a possible heart attack.

2) Design an app that would reverse the signal of all malware to the source computer and cook it. Normal communications would not activate this app.

Someone is going to come up with these ideas and solutions, so don't say it can't be done.

Terry Thompson

Ravenel Drive

Charleston

Political interests

I am always disgusted to hear politicians, whether they be Charleston County or City of Charleston, include in every speech the perfunctory statement of how much they love Charleston and its citizens.

But, these same politicians are always the proponents of some new development project, be it a useless highway, another cramped neighborhood, another shopping center or another ugly building that will further detract from the character of Charleston, and will adversely impact its citizens but will be of great benefit to those whose financial interest they support. But the elected always say that whatever project it is will be beneficial to all.

The problem is that these politicians and their business cohorts are enabled in their destructive plans by a citizenry that is largely apathetic.

Residents of our city love Charleston too, but not enough to rise up and question the actions of their elected officials.

Wayne Andrus

Stono River Drive

Charleston

Why annoy Putin?

President Obama is going to great lengths to irritate Premier Putin of Russia in a variety of ways. This is dangerous and detrimental to what should be American foreign policy.

It is not smart to deliberately irritate the Russians even though we don't always agree on issues. We need their help on some of them, particularly in the Middle East.

Let's not let our many unsolved domestic issues occupy us and ignore equally important foreign ones. I urge the president to get back on track before it's too late.

Phil Siegrist

Plantation Lane

Mount Pleasant

Wildcats wow

The West Ashley High School Band wowed parents, relatives and all in attendance at the band's holiday concert on Dec. 16. Kudos to band director James Shealy and associate band director Kevin Lankin, who are molding these students into promising musicians.

The students performed songs and dance of the Christmas and holiday spirit. It was a wonderful night, and these young adults relayed to all of us a sense of pride and happiness.

It's not often enough that credit is given to our local public schools for their fine programs. Great job, WAHS!

Tammy Allen

Michael ALlen

Downing Street

Charleston

Support Panthers

Thank you to The Post and Courier sports team for the recent coverage of the Carolina Panthers, NFC South Division Champions.

It was only a few short months back that a letter to the editor complained about coverage for the team.

On behalf of all us locals who have season tickets, we thank you and look forward to much more coverage as we head to Charlotte for the playoffs.

It's time to support the Carolina Panthers.

Scott Blue

Jardinere Walk

Mount Pleasant

The right turn

A Dec. 27 letter concerning the Standard Apartment Homes to be built on Maybank Highway noted that if completed, a right turn lane on Maybank into the complex would help. I think what would help more is a left turn lane off Maybank into the complex.

Irving S. Rosenfeld

Simpkins Street

James Island