Brett Dennen

After scoring hits with the singles “Ain’t No Reason,” “Make You Crazy,” “Sydney (I’ll Come Running)” and “Comeback Kid (That’s My Dog)” from three consecutively successful albums, Brett Dennen was feeling the pressure of high expectations for his next release. So for the first time in Dennen’s nine-year recording career, the singer-songwriter left his home state of California to record.

The 33-year-old folk singer first retreated to a mountain home in Northern California, where he wrote in solitude before traveling to Nashville, Tenn., to record with producer Charlie Peacock (The Civil Wars).

In addition to Peacock, Dennen also recruited musicians he had never worked with before in a bid to quell commercial pressures, ignite inspiration and create a sound foreign to his previous efforts.

The result was “Smoke and Mirrors,” an album that showcases the upbeat and simple “coffeehouse” sound for which Dennen is known for while also carrying a larger anthemic undertone more appropriate for his growing live audiences.

Brett Dennen will perform Monday at the Music Farm, 32 Ann St., with Noah Gunderson. Tickets are $17 in advance, $20 the day of the show, and are available at the door or online at Ticketfly.com. This event is open to ages 16 and up. Doors open at 7 p.m. with the show slated to start at 8 p.m.

Call 577-6969 or go to MusicFarm.com for more information.

Tech N9ne

Aaron Dontez Yates, whose stage name is Tech N9ne, began his rap career in his native Kansas City, Mo., as a youth to help him with his spelling.

By the time Yates reached adulthood, he was a key member of the rising rap group Black Mafia before joining the 57th Street Rogue Dog Villains and later Nnutthowze and The Regime.

The success of all his group efforts was fleeting, however, and Yates eventually aimed his efforts toward a solo career full time in 1999.

Yates’s fast, fluid and often bizarre delivery and content has earned him comparisons to other rappers such as Eminem and Busta Rhymes, but his music style borders on metal-inspired rap that often explores dark themes and hard-core influences.

With 13 studio albums under his belt and a career spanning two decades, Yates has proven to be one of the most innovative and influential rappers still active today.

Tech N9ne will perform Friday at the Music Farm, 32 Ann St., in support of his recently released album “Something Else.” Also set to perform are Krizz Kaliko, Ces Cru, Stevie Stone, Prozak and Mayday. Tickets are $25 and are available at the door or online at Ticketfly.com. This is event is open to ages 16 and up. Doors open at 8 p.m. with the show set to begin at 9 p.m.

Call 577-6969 or go to MusicFarm.com for more information.

J. Roddy Walston and the Business

When J. Roddy Walston recorded a demo in his Tennessee basement more than a decade ago, he had no idea if anyone would even listen to it, much less want to come see him perform the songs live or buy his records. But the budding singer-songwriter’s demo bested 350 other aspiring songwriters’ demos for a showcase slot at a national music festival.

When Walston moved to Baltimore for a girl a short time later, he was introduced to musicians Billy Gordon and Steve Colmus, and the beginnings of the Business was formed.

Combining his experience playing piano in church and singing Gospel music alongside his grandmother, Walston brings a revivalist’s energy back to old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll but manages to preserve the soul and storytelling of his country and blues roots.

Walston and his band earlier this year finished a brief tour opening for The Lumineers and are currently headlining its own club tour in support of its new album, “Essential Tremors.”

J. Roddy Walston and the Business will perform Monday at The Pour House, 1977 Maybank Highway, with Reignwolf. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 the day of the show, and are available at the door or online at StrangerTickets.com. Doors open at 8 p.m. with the show starting at 9 p.m.

Call 571-4343 or go to CharlestonPourHouse.com for more information.