Dad: Voice on tape is Trayvon’s

  • Posted: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 12:01 a.m.
Tracy Martin, the father of Trayvon Martin, pauses while testifying Monday.

BY MIKE SCHNEIDER and KYLE HIGHTOWER

Associated Press

SANFORD, FLA. — Trayvon Martin’s father testified Monday that he never denied it was his son’s voice screaming for help on a 911 call, contradicting police officers’ earlier testimony at George Zimmerman’s second-degree murder trial.

Tracy Martin was the latest in a series of witnesses called by lawyers on both sides who are seeking to convince jurors of who was the aggressor in the confrontation that left Trayvon Martin dead. Later in the day, the judge ruled that defense attorneys may present evidence to the jury that Trayvon Martin had marijuana in his system when he died.

The teen’s father testified that he merely told officers he couldn’t tell if it was his son after his first time listening to the call which captured the audio of fight between Martin and Zimmerman.

“I never said that wasn’t my son’s voice,” said Tracy Martin, who added that he concluded it was his son after listening to the call as many as 20 times.

Before Tracy Martin took the witness stand, the lead investigator probing Martin’s death testified that the father had answered “no” when the detective asked if the screams belonged to Trayvon Martin. Officer Chris Serino played the 911 call for Tracy Martin in the days immediately following Trayvon Martin’s death in February 2012.

“He looked away and under his breath he said ‘no’,” Serino said of Tracy Martin.

Officer Doris Singleton backed up Serino’s account.

Convincing the jury of who was screaming for help on the tape is important to both sides because it would help jurors evaluate Zimmerman’s self-defense claim. Relatives of Martin’s and George Zimmerman’s have offered conflicting opinions about who is heard screaming.

Late in the day, Judge Debra Nelson made a key ruling out of the presence of the jury.

The judge denied a prosecution request to keep out parts of a toxicology report that shows Trayvon Martin had small amounts of marijuana in his system.

Prosecutors argued the information would be prejudicial.

But defense attorneys said it was relevant since Zimmerman believed Martin was under the influence at the time he spotted him in his neighborhood. Nelson had ruled before the trial that mention of marijuana wouldn’t be allowed in opening statements.

Next, the judge considered a prosecution motion to stop defense attorneys from presenting an animated depiction of the fatal fight between Martin and Zimmerman.

Prosecutors’ motion requests that the animation commissioned by the defense not be mentioned or played at Zimmerman’s trial, claiming it would only confuse jurors. The judge hadn’t made a ruling Monday afternoon.

Most of the day was taken up by a series of Zimmerman’s friends called to testify that the screams on the recording were his, and the 911 call was played multiple times in the courtroom.

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