The lines of cars weren’t quite up to recent shows — which had attracted dozens of car fans driving Mustangs, Corvettes, Challengers, imports and exotic models.

Yet the Street Thunder car show Sept. 28 brought out a sprightly mix of vehicles in its first spin at the Carolina Ice Palace parking area in North Charleston and on a day with three other sizable car gatherings.

“We usually have 150 cars minimum,” said Jerry Holst, of organizer Coastal Carolina Corvette Club. “We had to change our date,” he said, as well as relocate from the show’s regular spot for the past few years at Tanger Outlets.

The Street Thunder show this year drew 81 cars, not including the Corvette club vehicles. Holst said he’s pleased with the result, noting that the show met one of its most crucial goals.

“We raised a lot of money,” Holst said. Proceeds benefit Honor Flight Lowcountry. “That’s the most important thing,” he said.

According to its website, Honor Flight Lowcountry is a volunteer group dedicated to seeing that as many Charleston area WWII veterans as possible can visit the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., built in their honor.

It’s an independent chapter of Honor Flight Network, founded in 2005 with the goal of flying veterans from around the country to the Memorial. The first flight from Charleston took place Nov. 7, 2009.

At the Street Thunder show last Saturday, a number of modified cars and trucks were on hand.

David Fischbach brought his blue 1985 Nissan 720, which showcased adjustable air suspension that allowed the truck body to move up and down. At its lowest point, the frame nearly nipped the ground and almost covered the tires.

One of the perks on the 28-year-old Nissan? “An all-fiberglass interior,” Fischbach said.

For more information, visit the Corvette club at www.4cccc.org.

Reach Jim Parker at 937-5542 or jparker@postandcourier.com.