Westerns TV star Dale Robertson dies

Dale Robertson, an Oklahoma native who became a star of television and movie Westerns during the genre’s heyday, died Tuesday. He was 89.

Robertson’s niece said her uncle died at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., following a brief illness.

Dale Robertson had bit parts in films including “The Boy with the Green Hair” and the Joan Crawford vehicle “Flamingo Road” before landing more high-profile roles such as Jesse James in “Fighting Man of the Plains.”

In the 1950s, he moved into television, starring in series such as “Tales of Wells Fargo” (1957-62), “Iron Horse” (1966) and “Death Valley Days” (1968-70).

S.C. court nixes Brown estate settlement

The South Carolina Supreme Court on Wednesday overturned a settlement divvying up the multimillion-dollar estate of James Brown, saying a former attorney general didn’t follow the late soul singer’s wishes in putting together the deal.

Body: Attorney General Henry McMaster brokered a settlement in 2009 that split Brown’s estate, giving nearly half to a charitable trust, a quarter to his widow, Tomi Rae Hynie, and leaving the rest to be split among his adult children.

But the justices ruled that the deal ignored Brown’s wishes for most of his money to go to charity. The court also ruled the Godfather of Soul was of sound mind when he made his will before dying of heart failure on Christmas Day 2006 at age 73. The court sent the estate back to a lower court to be reconsidered.

Former Allman Brothers member dies

Former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dan Toler has died following a two-year battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, otherwise known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. He was 65.

A family friend confirmed earlier this week that Toler died in his sleep. Toler, originally from Indiana, joined the Allman Brothers in 1979. In 1982, he joined The Gregg Allman band along with his brother, David “Frankie” Toler.

Singer Scott Weiland responds to STP firing

Singer Scott Weiland said he learned that he’d been fired by the Stone Temple Pilots when the band released a one-sentence statement to the media Wednesday.

“I learned of my supposed ‘termination’ from Stone Temple Pilots this morning by reading about it in the press,” he wrote in a statement. “Not sure how I can be ‘terminated’ from a band that I founded, fronted and co-wrote many of its biggest hits, but that’s something for the lawyers to figure out.”

The statement by the band said: “Stone Temple Pilots have announced they have officially terminated Scott Weiland.”

Wire reports